Cupboard Door Ice Cream Sign-Tutorial

Don’t toss old cupboard doors from a kitchen redo. They may have been ugly hanging in your kitchen, but with a little paint and a hanger, they can become the canvas for a primitive wall hanging. The recipe on this snowman ice cream sign is real, but even if I never use it, I love the sign for the novelty of it.

Things You Will Need:

Cupboard door
Navy blue acrylic paint
Paintbrush
Pencil
Stencil brush
White acrylic paint
Blush and cotton swab
Black acrylic paint
Wooden skewer
Orange dimensional paint
Black permanent marker
Wrapping paper
Scissors
White paint pen
Drill and small drill bit
Baling wire
Wire cutters
Homespun fabric scraps
Raffia

Step 1
Clean the door. It’s been hanging in someone’s kitchen for years so it probably has a layer of grease and grime. Don’t be afraid to get out the steel wool. Since this is a primitive wall hanging, a few scratches, dents and dings are not going to be a problem.

Step 2
Determine what area of the cupboard door’s front will be painted with the background. My door had a frame built around it, so I used the area inside the frame for the background. If your door doesn’t have a frame, you may choose to mask off the edges to create your own frame, or eliminate the framed look by painting the background to the edges of the door. Once you have decided on the placement of your background, paint it using navy blue acrylic paint. I lucked out with a quart of wall paint I found at a yard sale for 25 cents. Allow the paint to dry and repeat until you have achieved full coverage.

Step 3
Paint the snowman. Remember, this is a primitive design, so perfect lines and shapes are not necessary. I positioned the snowman in the bottom left corner. The top of his head almost reaches the center height of the sign, and the widest part of his body extends to almost the center width of the sign. Lightly trace the outline of the snowman with a pencil. Dip a stencil brush into white acrylic paint, pounce the outline and fill in the body of the snowman. Allow the paint to dry.

Step 4
Apply cheeks to the snowman using blush and a cotton swab. Dip the blunt end of a skewer into black acrylic paint. Dot two eyes and a line of dots in a smile shape for the mouth. Using orange dimensional paint, apply a carrot-shaped nose to the center of the face.

Step 5
Outline the snowman’s body using a black permanent marker. Add a stick arm if desired.

Step 6
Measure and cut a piece of wrapping paper the same size as your sign’s background. Lay the paper on your work surface with the back side facing up. You are making a guide for the placement of the snowman ice cream recipe. Mark off the area on the paper where the snowman would be. Using a pencil, copy the following recipe. Note: For each new line I made on mine I made a new line on the recipe below. Since your door is probably not the same size as mine, you will want to adjust the placement to fit your door.

Turn your frown
upside down
with a big bowl of…
Snowman Ice Cream
Beat 2 c. cream
Add 1/4 c. sugar
1 teas. vanilla
~Mix~ quickly
Stir into 2qts.
of fresh clean
snow. Place
in a big
snowdrift
to freeze.
YUM YUM

Step 7
Using your guide for placement, write the recipe on your door using a white paint pen. Dip the blunt end of a wooden skewer in white acrylic paint and dot the ends and intersections of each letter. Allow the paint to dry.

Step 8
Measure down 1 inch from the top edge of your sign and find the center of the sign’s width. Measure 4 inches from each side of the center and mark with a pencil. Using a drill and a small bit, drill through the door at your marks. Cut an 18-inch length of baling wire using wire cutters. Thread the ends of the wire through the holes from the back to the front. Bend the ends up and twist around the wire that is creating the curved hanger.

Step 9
Rip a couple strips of homespun fabric. Tie the fabric strips and a strand of raffia around the wire.

I like navy blue paint for a snowman background, but a different color could always be used.

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Santa’s Union Suit Ornament

It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas!

Actually, in my house, preparing for Christmas is an all-year, on-going process. It has to be. When you sell at craft sales you can’t wait until December to start making merchandise. I have a show this weekend that I originally didn’t think I would be able to do. It runs Friday through Sunday. Friday wasn’t going to work for me, but they are allowing us to come in Saturday morning to set up for the remaining two days. The event is the Habitat For Humanity 4th Annual Festival of Trees in Arkansas City, Kansas. Come check it out.

These Santa union suits are a quickie craft I am whipping up (last-minute) for the show.

I work in assembly line style. I seem to be able to accomplish more in a short amount of time that way.

The attached back flap hides a slit for filling the suit with special treats.

The entire outer edge of the suit is stitched closed. The ribbon hanger is attached at the same time.

After adding buttons to the front…

…and the back…

It is ready to hang on the tree.

Chair Back Snowman Family

Time to show you what I did with those old chairs I showed you a couple of weeks ago.

Chair Back Snowman Family (Chair 1)

Chair Back Snowman Family (Chair 2)

They were chairs I salvaged from “The House“.

They were too rickety to actually be used as chairs, but I loved the spindles and their back story, so I just had to come up with something that would allow them to give a few more years of enjoyment.

I used a jigsaw to cut across the seat. The glue that held the legs in was pretty much gone, or was just a powdery consistency. It took no effort to simply pull the legs out.

The chair with the “solid” seat was cracked. It must have been that way for years, because someone had attached a board across the seat on the bottom to keep the split together. Since this board kinda created legs to one edge of the cut seat, I added another board to prevent the chair back from tipping over.

The other chair back needed no alterations. I was ready to craft.

I painted both chair backs using off white wall paint that I had picked up at a yard sale for next to nothing. Since the wood was pretty old, it soaked it up pretty good. A few coats were necessary.

The inner spindles became the snowmen. The amount of spindles inside the chair back frame determined how many snowmen were in the family.

I added pine garland around the frame…

…and scarves around the snowman necks.

So, are you inspired to go dumpster diving?

Party On!

I WAS FEATURED!!!:)
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Sorority Craft Show

I’ve been getting ready for the Sorority Craft Show in Arkansas City, Kansas tomorrow. It’s located in the Ag building (affectionately known as the pig palace), and is open from 10:00am – 3:00pm.

As usual, if a treasure wasn’t nailed down (and sometimes even when it was) I glued, painted or stitched it into a restyled treasure. The following are a few of my new projects I crafted for this show.

Timber Snowmen

I just love these frosty guys. I’m not sure why, but they remind me of little cowboy snowmen. Must be the log shaped bodies.

Reindeer Bed Springs

I try to come up with a new bed spring craft every year. This seems to be the year of the reindeer. In this picture they weren’t attached to the springs yet, but they have since been completed.

Star Santa Pillows

Another one of those projects that had my sewing machine beeping like a bomb.

Polka Dot Rocking Horse

Just a little peek at a restyled wooden rocking horse. I’ll have more on this transformation in a later post.

A bowl of glittered bulb ornaments. I never, never throw anything away.

Chenille Bedspread Candy Canes

Tobacco Can Snowmen

More Mini Rag Wrapped Candy Canes

These were made from the wire tent stakes I had mentioned before.

Shutter Snowmen


These chairs are just a sneaky peak at a project I will be posting about soon.

Most people would probably have tossed these old relics, but I am glad I didn’t. Can’t wait to show you what they became.

If you are in my neck of the woods tomorrow, come visit me at the show.

Making Chenille Candy Cane Bombs

Okay, maybe not bombs, but by the time I finished this pile of chenille candy canes I felt like I had been disarming a bomb for hours.

The chenille bedspread I used was a hobnail chenille bedspread. That means the bumpy cord that makes the design isn’t fuzzy. It looks a lot more like candlewicking, and isn’t necessarily soft. But it looks really, really cool, so I just have to use it…no matter if doing so turns me into a nervous wreck.

The sewing on these requires each candy stripe to be top stitched to the chenille cane shape. Once completed, the striped candy cane is stitched to another layer of chenille.


As I am stitching along…minding my own business…my needle will stitch over one (or several) of those hobnail bumps causing the needle to freeze, as my machine screeches and begins beeping like a bomb that is getting ready to blow. Like a crazy person, I punch the appropriate buttons and adjust the needle to quiet my nerves the machine.

Once calmed, I continued sewing, only to have it happen again and again. It was so worth it! I just love the way a bunch of these look piled in a basket.

You can find the complete tutorial here.