Patriotic Funky Chicken

10-DSCF4146Patriotic Funky Chicken

Sometimes you just gotta let your funk fly.

1-DSCF2218I haven’t done anything with albums since I made my snowmen signs last year, but my pile of vinyl has been calling.

01-DSCF4069A couple coats of tan paint created the background and then a line traced horizontally across the record, just above the center formed the top of the chicken’s body.

02-DSCF4074With the area above the line masked off, I stenciled white paint to fill in the body.

03-DSCF4076Masking off lines, I was able to stencil 5 red stripes. I also painted a triangle shaped beak using a yellow/gold paint.

07-DSCF4150The wing and the tail feathers were cut from aluminum beverage cans.

08-DSCF4152To give them a texture, I rolled them through my cuttlebug before painting them.

04-DSCF4080They were attached with wire after I painted a rough brown outline around the record, along the stripes and around the beak.

06-DSCF4086I drilled a couple holes at the top for attaching a fabric hanger…

05-DSCF4081…and a couple of holes on the bottom for attaching wire chicken legs. The legs were painted yellow/gold.

A white paint pen was used for writing “Liberty”.

09-DSCF4154Lastly, I spattered the entire surface with blue and white paint.

10-DSCF4146I kinda like the way he turned out.

Enjoy!

Summer Wine Glass Coasters

1-DSCF4092Summer Wine Glass Coasters

Okay, these can actually be used any time of the year, but when the weather heats up the glasses sweat badly. Insert the foot of your wine glass inside these “cozy” little coasters and your furniture will be protected. You also don’t have to worry about tips or losing the coaster when you move it because the coaster is actually attached to the wine glass. Some of us may need that help after a glass or too. 😉

8-DSCF4116For the this project session I chose patriotic fabric for one type and Wizard of Oz fabric for two other types. My dear friend, Mary W. picked up the Wizard of Oz fabric for me several years ago when she went to a quilt show. See, Mary, I knew I would find just the right project for this yummy fabric.

These coasters will be heading to my Etsy shop in the next day or so, but if you would like to make your own, I’m a giver. Here is my wine glass coaster tutorial.

7-wine glass cozy coasterI wrote this tutorial last year so the photos for the steps were done with different fabric than the ones I made this week.

Things You Will Need:

Light to medium weight scrap fabric-two different colors or designs
Ruler
Scissors
Iron
Straight pins
Wine glass

1-wine glass cozy coasterCut five 4-inch squares from light to medium weight fabric. Leftover squares from quilt projects is ideal. You will need three of one fabric and two of another.

5-DSCF4108Fold one square in half with the right sides facing out. Iron the fold. Repeat on a matching square and two of the other fabric squares for a total of four pressed squares that are now shaped like rectangles.

2-wine glass cozy coasterPlace the remaining unfolded square on your work surface with the right side facing up.

3-wine glass cozy coasterWith the raw edges of the rectangles aligned with the raw edges of the square, work around the square.

5-wine glass cozy coasterPlace one rectangle on each edge, turning the square one-quarter turn after the placement of each rectangle. Insert the end of the last rectangle under the end of the first.

6-wine glass cozy coasterPin the raw edges of the rectangles to the outer edges of the square. Sew around the pinned edges using a 1/4-inch seam allowance.

Clip each of the corners to reduce bulk.

3-DSCF4098Turn the cozy coaster right side out through the opening in the center of the rectangles. Use the point of your scissors to poke out the corners. Iron the cozy flat.

Slip the foot of your wine glass into the center of the cozy.

4-DSCF4104Note: All of the wine glasses I have used had feet with a diameter of 2 1/2 inches. This may be standard, but they may also be available in other sizes. If the feet of your glasses are bigger (I can’t imagine them smaller), simply cut your squares 1 1/2 inches larger than the diameter measurement. Example: Cut 4 1/2-inch squares for a 3-inch diameter foot.

This is an inexpensive hostess gift, whether you sew your own or purchase. Check out my Etsy shop in a few days if you would rather purchase than make your own.

Enjoy!

Wood Pile To Garden

7-DSCF4090Rain, rain, go away!

This process is taking much longer than we anticipated, in large part because it won’t stop raining.

3-DSCF4053This is where we finally moved my wood pile. When we moved into this house in Nov./Dec., we were trying to beat the bad weather and the wood was piled next to the driveway. The plan was to move it to a spot beside the house and put in a garden where the wood had been.

It has taken forever!

2-DSCF4052I didn’t get a before pic of the old wood pile, but after getting it all moved and the grass trimmed, this is what our new garden area looked like.

5-DSCF4060We decided on a raised-bed garden. The frame actually went together pretty quickly.

6-DSCF4088We then lined it with landscape fabric and had a load of dirt delivered.

And then the rains came again. I really wanted to finish this post with wonderful plants planted nicely, but we have been waiting for the mud to dry out enough to work in. Who knows how long that will take. Like a good portion of the Midwest, we have had rain, are having rain, or expecting lots more rain.

sigh…well, eventually…

4-DSCF4055At least the wood pile looks good!

Enjoy!

Footstool/Child’s Chair

3-DSCF4032Footstool/Child’s Chair

1-DSCF4012I’ve had this little stool for quite a while, but I haven’t really used it since our first move. This finish just didn’t seem to fit with my decor. In my house if it sticks around long enough it will probably be repainted.

I started out with a couple coats of white paint, thinking I would probably distress it with sanding. Since I have a couple of other projects planned with the same distressing technique and color, I decided to give this stool a crackle finish instead.

4-DSCF4034I no longer purchase expensive crackle mediums for this technique. Cheap white glue is my medium of choice. It is thickly applied over the base color and the top color is painted over the glue while it is still wet. A hair dryer is then used to quickly crackle and dry the layers. FYI, the thicker the glue the bigger the cracks.

5-DSCF4036When crackling, I do one surface at a time, always with that surface flat and facing up. This prevents the wet layers from sliding and sagging. Let’s face it, nobody likes saggy cracks.

2-DSCF4028Glue crackling takes a little bit more time, but the finished results and the cash in my pocket makes it worth while.

Enjoy!

Painted Faux Grain Sack Barrel

5-DSCF4024Painted Faux Grain Sack Barrel

1-DSCF4008I’ve had this barrel for several years, but since I no longer have a barn to keep it in, it has been in storage. I had used it to store craft supplies in, but moving it into the house in it’s original state was not happening. I like old and rustic, but the stains just didn’t appeal to me. The coffee cup puts the size into perspective.

The barrel is made of heavy cardboard, the bottom and the lid is wood and there is a metal ring around the bottom edge. I painted it all white, but it was boring. Since it was not only going to be used as storage again, but also as part of my home’s decor, it needed a little something-something.

2-DSCF4016I decided to give it a faux grain sack appearance. I masked off stripes on the top and bottom using painter’s tape.

3-DSCF4017The tape made painting nice crisp lines super easy.

4-DSCF4026But I still wasn’t done. The fleur-de-lis stencil I had used on the small end table a few weeks ago was sitting nearby.

Perfect!

5-DSCF4024It added just the right finish to the lid of the barrel.

I have a few more barrels of various sizes that could also be improved with this restyle. Yay!

Enjoy!