Fall Crafts 2016

Candy Corn Bowl FillersWow! Yep, it’s been a while since I last posted, but I have a good excuse. The last few months have been spent on purchasing a new/old home and moving. It’s a fixer upper so there will be lots more on that at a later date. For now, craft shows are in full swing and I want to share some of the things I have been working on.

dscf9271New Halloween Pillow

I made these using tea stained chenille bedspreads. They have been a big hit.

dscf9275My New Halloween Sign

DSCF4953I also made more of these. I’ve made them the last few years and they have sold really well.

dscf9277Autumn Shutters

Since I seem to collect shutters like dust bunnies, I’m always working on new shutter designs. I tried something a bit different with this one by turning it on its side. I really like the way it turned out.

dscf9281Burlap Wreaths

My plan for this one was to follow a tutorial I had found online, but I ended up coming up with my one plan. The wreath form was supposed to have three space rows. I ordered wreath forms and was bummed to see when they arrived that they only had two space rows. If I can avoid returning something I will so I came up with my own technique to make the “oops” a winner.

dscf9285Old Painted Jars

While this craft isn’t necessarily just a fall craft, it is a new one for the shows this year. The jars came from an old house from a few years ago. They are very cool, but the glass was too discolored to leave plain. They got a coat of creamy paint and then sanded to distress. I finished up with the addition of burlap bows and some stars from my stash. What do you think?

dscf9283Stuffed Pumpkins

These have been a popular seller for a few years now.


New Fall Craft Show Projects-2015

DSCF5368We have participated in craft shows for three weekends in a row. Thankfully, this weekend we can take a break.

After each craft show I was either making more of things that had sold or making new things to fill in the holes from past sales. The shows were good, but keeping up with more projects was quite a whirlwind of activity. I didn’t take time to get pics of before or during steps of the new things, but I did make sure I snapped finished photos.

DSCF5345Fence Board Snowmen

I should have thought these through a little bit better when I designed them. After they were finished and I was loading them, I realized they were about an inch and a half too tall to stand in the trailer. I had to lay them down to get them in. (sigh) I will definitely be tweaking this project next time I make them.

DSCF5348Snowman Wall Hangings

The snowmen were made using a white chenille bedspread. For something a little different with the wood construction, I chose to put the horizontal wood braces on the front.

DSCF5353Giddy Up Signs

I’ve made these “Giddy Up” signs before, but it’s been a few years. They were made using the inner panels from old doors.

DSCF5357Stenciled Bench

This was a transformation from a yard sale find. A little paint, a little sanding and a little stenciling.

There were many more projects that were just remakes on things I had sold a lot of or sold out of. Most of those I had already posted on my blog in the past so I didn’t take new pics.

DSCF5362My front porch finally got a transformation into fall. I hauled a screen door home from my storage unit to add height to the display. I really like the way it looks. It’s kinda perfect that it’s black too.

Happy Fall Y’all!


More Witchy Wisdom

More Witchy WisdomWitchy Wisdom

It’s that time of year again. Time to craft in preparation for fall craft shows.

These witchy signs have been a big hit the last couple of years so I headed out to the woodpile to find wood that had potential for making more. I’ve made these with pallet boards, wood chair seats and cupboard doors, but this time I used scraps from my brother’s new fence.

DSCF4876He had quite a few pieces that were already cut to the same size, so I didn’t have much cutting to get them prepared.

DSCF4877I try to buy gallons of paint colors that I use a lot of. I’ve used this same orange paint for about three years. Sigh…it’s almost gone so I’ll need to be buying more soon.

DSCF4902The stencil was made using my Cricut. It’s the same one I have used since the first sign I made. It’s just card stock, but it has held up well.

DSCF4944I tried something new this year. I had some black raffia in my stash so I used it for the witch brooms. In the past I have used the natural raffia. I really like them in black.

DSCF4953The last touch was attaching green raffia to the rusty wire handle.


Pumpkin Candle Holder

1-100_1705Pumpkin Candle Holder

Since my kids are older, I find that my holiday decorating has evolved from the plastic manufactured holiday decorations, to decorations that are mainly handmade and carry a theme with their color and presentation. There are no more plastic clings in the windows that have been stuck on with spit. I still like whimsical decorations, but they are sprinkled among more sophisticated items that say “adults live here and they still like to have fun.”

Fall is my favorite time of year. I love the crispness to the air, the leaves crunching under my feet and the warm glow of a fireplace or candles. The house I live in does not have a fireplace, so candles it is. I made a fall candle holder using a pumpkin as the base. It looks great as a table centerpiece, but would also be pretty on a fireplace mantle or side table.

The instructions for this candle holder can be altered to fit any size pumpkin by adjusting the size of the candle used.

Materials Needed:

Pumpkin-mine was about the size of a basketball
Serrated knife or pumpkin carving tools
Pillar candle-Mine was 2 1/2 inches in diameter and 4 inches tall
Marking pen
Spoon or scoop of some sort
Object to use as a pedestal
Fall floral decorations
Hot glue gun-optional

Carefully cut around the stem of your pumpkin and remove it. This cut does not need to be a perfect circle, but it does need to be smaller than the diameter of your candle.

Stand the pillar candle over the hole and trace around it with a marking pen. If the top of the pumpkin is not level, tip the candle to a level position before tracing around it. Cut around the traced line, keeping the cuts straight up and down. You do want to be fairly precise with this cut. The candle will fit inside this hole snuggly to prevent a lot of air flow. The less air in the pumpkin, the longer it will last.

Dilemma: To clean out the guts or not to clean out the guts. I decided to clean and cut away the guts directly below the hole I had carved, but I left the rest inside. The guts inside are not going to show anyway. The spot below the hole needed the space for a pedestal to place the candle on. I figured the candle would begin to sink after a few days if it didn’t have a stable surface to rest on.

Scavenge for a plastic or glass object that will fit inside the hole of the pumpkin to create a pedestal for your candle. It needs to sit flat on the bottom of the pumpkin and the top of it needs to sit below the cutout opening. I used a glass bud vase. Place your pillar candle inside the hole and resting securely on the pedestal.

2-100_1705-001Decorate around the base of the candle. Place a fall floral candle ring around the candle, wind a short section of a fall garland around the candle, or hot glue a variety of silk fall leaves, flowers and berries around the candle. The first two ideas are much more frugal. The pumpkin will eventually decay and you can recycle decorations for a new candle holder.

There are a couple of safety tips I feel I should mention. One, do not leave your candle burning in an unoccupied room and two, place your pumpkin on a plate or flower pot saucer to prevent any seepage from destroying your table’s surface.


Primitive Pumpkin Shutter

5-DSCN2316-001Primitive Pumpkin Shutter

I love turning things that end up on the curb into fun and whimsical seasonal decorations. Paint an old window shutter into a primitive pumpkin shutter for fall and Halloween decor. Not a painter? No problem. This is a primitive project, and crisp straight lines are not required. Except for the drying time of the paint, this shutter can be completed very quickly.

Things You Will Need:

Old window shutter
Tools for removing hardware
Orange acrylic paint
Paper plate
Sea sponge
Black acrylic paint
Stencil brush
Kitchen sponges
Permanent marker
Yellow-gold acrylic paint
Artist’s paintbrush
Green acrylic paint

1-DSCN2274-001Remove any hinges, knobs and hooks from your shutter and clean well.

Pour orange acrylic paint onto a paper plate. Wet a sea sponge and wring it out well. Dip the sponge in the paint and sponge it over the front, back and side surfaces of the shutter. Do not worry about complete coverage. This project allows for the original surface to peek through. Allow the paint to dry.

2-DSCN2286-001Many window shutters have a spine on the front that opens and closes the slats. For this project, this side will be the back. You want the flattest side to paint your pumpkin on. Lay the shutter with the flat side facing up. This is now the front. Pour black paint onto a paper plate. Dip the sea sponge in the paint and dab it on the front and sides of the shutter. The back will remain orange. Allow the paint to dry.

4-DSCN2301-001Using a large stencil brush, pounce orange paint in a long oval that covers most of the front surface on the shutter. This is your pumpkin shape. Allow the paint to dry.

3-DSCN2294-001Trace a 3-inch-tall triangle with a 2-inch base on a kitchen sponge using a permanent marking pen. Cut out the shape using scissors. Raggedy edges are fine. Draw a 1 1/2-inch-wide by 4 1/4-inch long rectangle on another kitchen sponge. Round the corners of the rectangle. Cut out the rectangle.

Dip the triangle into black acrylic paint. Stamp the triangle in the center of the pumpkin shape. This is the nose. Using the triangle and black paint, apply the eyes above the nose as desired. Dip the rectangle sponge into yellow-gold acrylic paint and stamp a mouth below the nose. Allow the paint to dry.

Dip an artist’s paintbrush into black acrylic paint. Paint a thin line around the mouth. This is supposed to look primitive, so perfect lines are not necessary. Paint a thin line across the center of the mouth. Paint vertical lines across the center line to create the teeth. Allow the paint to dry.

Using green acrylic paint, paint a stem at the top of the pumpkin.

5-DSCN2316-001My shutter was 6 1/2 inches wide by 20 inches long. This primitive project allows for altering and adjusting the steps to fit on any size shutter.

The finished shutter will lean against a wall or furniture, as it will not lay flat because of the spine on the back.