Fence Wood Flags

9-DSCF4435Fence Wood Flags

My brother has been replacing his fence and I have been lucky enough to be the recipient of the old wood, as well as scraps of the new wood.

1-DSCF4406These flags were created from the new wood scraps because most of them were already cut to the size I wanted. The only thing I needed to cut was the square for the blue field.

2-DSCF4410I decided that two pieces of wood made the perfect size for the flag, so the white stripe was painted to overlap both pieces.

3-DSCF4412Masking was essential for a nice crisp stripe.

4-DSCF4413After basing with the red, white and blue paint, then adding a stenciled star on the blue field…,

5-DSCF4417…I aged each piece with stain. Wow! That new wood sucked up the stain. Only six flags used up more than half a quart.

6-DSCF4424I wanted something a little bit different than my normal sign construction, so I connected the flag boards with rusty baling wire.

7-DSCF4430The blue fields were attached with my staple gun.

9-DSCF4435After adding the hanger, they still looked kinda blah so I added an old bottle cap to the center of the star and ripped a strip from old blue jeans to tie around the hanger.

8-DSCF4432Happy 4th of July!

Enjoy!

Shabby-Antiqued Cupboard

7-DSCF4396Shabby-Antiqued Cupboard

1-DSCF4040This cupboard was a find my youngest son brought home to me.

2-DSCF4042It had fabulous bones, but it was very blah. Just perfect for a restyle.

3-DSCF4230I started with a layer of light green paint, then continued with several coats of white.

4-DSCF4384I sanded it into yummy, shabby chic submission. I knew I would be sanded it after painting, but I had no idea if the green paint would be visible in the end. It was, but you have to look very, very close.

5-DSCF4385Not satisfied with the amount of green actually showing, I painted a green medallion on top and to the front of each door.

6-DSCF4391I completed the cupboard with an antiqued finish.

Enjoy!

Shabby Chic Train Cases

9-train caseShabby Chic Train Cases

1-train caseRestyle a vintage train case into a shabby chic case for organizing your vanity or corralling your photos and journals. This romantic container could also be used to display small vintage collectibles.

*This is a project I had originally published on FaveCrafts.

Things You Will Need:

Train case (overnight bag)
Craft knife
Rags
Light-colored, flat latex paint
Paintbrush
Sandpaper
Book pages
Ruler
Decoupage medium
Sponge brush
Measuring tape
3 1/2-inch wide lace
Scissors
Satin ribbon scrap
Key
Craft glue
Small flowers

2-train caseRemove the lining from the inside of your train case. The lining is glued in, so in most cases simply prying up an edge with a knife will allow you to grasp it and pull it out. If you encounter stubborn areas, cut it loose with a craft knife. Discard the lining.

Close the case. Use a wet rag on the outside of the case to remove dust and dirt.

3-train casePaint all sides of the case, including the hinges and latches, using a light-colored, flat latex paint. Allow the paint to dry and repeat with additional coats if necessary. Since old cases tend to soak up a lot of paint, I like to use wall paint left over from previous home improvement projects. It’s a great way to use up that little bit left in the can and it prevents the added cost of purchasing a large quantity of craft paint.

Undo the latches on the case and lightly paint over the areas that didn’t get painted when the latches were closed.

Lightly sand the surface and the edges of the case. Lightly sand over the metal of the latches and hinges. Wipe away the sanding dust using a dry rag.

Insert the blade of a craft knife in the gap between the lid and the case bottom. Allowing the gap to guide you, cut through the dry paint that is gluing the lid closed. After you have cut all the way around the case you will be able to pull open the lid.

Rip old book pages into 2 to 3-inch pieces. I used ripped book pages left over from other projects. They came from a variety of old books. Even though they didn’t match, the contrast of different book pages added interest to the project.

4-train caseWorking in one small area at a time, apply decoupage medium to the inside of the train case using a sponge brush. Place a book page piece over the medium. Smooth out the wrinkles and seal with a layer of medium over the paper. Repeat with additional book page pieces, overlapping their edges, until the inside of the case and lid has been completely covered. Allow the decoupage medium to dry.

5-train caseUsing a measuring tape, measure around the horizontal circumference of the case and add 24 inches. Using this measurement, cut a length of 3 1/2-inch wide lace. Wrap the lace around the case and tie the ends in a bow on the front.

7-train caseCut a 10-inch scrap of satin ribbon that coordinates with your paint color. Thread a key on the ribbon and tie the ribbon around the handle of the case. Using craft glue, attach a small flower to the key. Arrange and glue additional flowers to the lace bow.

8-train caseEnjoy!

Footstool/Child’s Chair

3-DSCF4032Footstool/Child’s Chair

1-DSCF4012I’ve had this little stool for quite a while, but I haven’t really used it since our first move. This finish just didn’t seem to fit with my decor. In my house if it sticks around long enough it will probably be repainted.

I started out with a couple coats of white paint, thinking I would probably distress it with sanding. Since I have a couple of other projects planned with the same distressing technique and color, I decided to give this stool a crackle finish instead.

4-DSCF4034I no longer purchase expensive crackle mediums for this technique. Cheap white glue is my medium of choice. It is thickly applied over the base color and the top color is painted over the glue while it is still wet. A hair dryer is then used to quickly crackle and dry the layers. FYI, the thicker the glue the bigger the cracks.

5-DSCF4036When crackling, I do one surface at a time, always with that surface flat and facing up. This prevents the wet layers from sliding and sagging. Let’s face it, nobody likes saggy cracks.

2-DSCF4028Glue crackling takes a little bit more time, but the finished results and the cash in my pocket makes it worth while.

Enjoy!

Painted Faux Grain Sack Barrel

5-DSCF4024Painted Faux Grain Sack Barrel

1-DSCF4008I’ve had this barrel for several years, but since I no longer have a barn to keep it in, it has been in storage. I had used it to store craft supplies in, but moving it into the house in it’s original state was not happening. I like old and rustic, but the stains just didn’t appeal to me. The coffee cup puts the size into perspective.

The barrel is made of heavy cardboard, the bottom and the lid is wood and there is a metal ring around the bottom edge. I painted it all white, but it was boring. Since it was not only going to be used as storage again, but also as part of my home’s decor, it needed a little something-something.

2-DSCF4016I decided to give it a faux grain sack appearance. I masked off stripes on the top and bottom using painter’s tape.

3-DSCF4017The tape made painting nice crisp lines super easy.

4-DSCF4026But I still wasn’t done. The fleur-de-lis stencil I had used on the small end table a few weeks ago was sitting nearby.

Perfect!

5-DSCF4024It added just the right finish to the lid of the barrel.

I have a few more barrels of various sizes that could also be improved with this restyle. Yay!

Enjoy!