Foam Cone Candy Corn-Tutorial

7-DSCN2206-001Foam Cone Candy Corn

When the kids go back to school, I start getting serious about crafting for fall and winter holidays. More specifically, I begin stocking up on quick projects to sell at local craft sales. This whimsical candy corn couldn’t be more simple. Made with a foam cone as the base, it is quickly wrapped with ripped strips of fabric. Make several candy corns in a variety of sizes and display them in a basket, or as a centerpiece on a dining table.

Things You Will Need:

White cotton fabric
Ruler
Scissors
Foam cone
Craft glue
Yellow cotton fabric
Marking pen
Orange cotton fabric

1-DSCN2196-001Rip 1-inch-wide strips of white cotton fabric. The strips can be any length, making this a great project for using up scraps. The amount of strips needed will depend on the size of the cone you are using. If you are being frugal, start with a few and rip more as needed.

2-DSCN2197-001Apply craft glue to the top point of your cone and around the first inch below the top. Fold one end of a strip over the top, completely covering the tip. Turn the strip and wrap around the cone just below the top. This start will hide the tip and secure the end of the strip.

3-DSCN2198-001Add more glue to the sides of the cone. Continue to wrap strips, overlapping the side edges of the strips after each wrap around the cone. You can completely cover the sides of the cone with glue at this time, but to avoid a mess, I apply glue to the next couple of inches below the top, continue to wrap the strips and add more glue as needed. As you finish off one strip, continue to add more until the whole cone has been wrapped with white fabric. Do not cover the bottom of the cone.

Lay yellow cotton fabric with the wrong side facing up on your work surface. Stand the cone on the fabric. Using a marking pen, trace around the bottom of the cone, 1 inch from the cone’s edge. Cut out the circle of yellow fabric.

4-DSCN2200-001Apply craft glue to the flat bottom of the cone. Place the fabric circle on the bottom with the right side of the fabric facing out. Center the circle with an even amount extending past the edges of the cone’s bottom. Cut the extended fabric in slits spaced 1/4 inch apart. Apply glue to the back of each slit and fold them over the edge of the cone.

5-DSCN2203-001Rip 1-inch-wide strips of the yellow cotton fabric. Starting on the sides of the bottom edge, apply glue and wrap the strip around the cone. Continue wrapping up the cone in the same way as the white strips were attached. Stop when the bottom third of the cone has been wrapped in yellow.

6-DSCN2205-001Rip 1-inch-wide strips of orange fabric. Wrap and glue them over the middle third of the cone. Note: The top white third does not need to be wrapped again.

7-DSCN2206-001To embellish, wrap raffia, jute or a fabric strip around the center of the candy corn and tie into a bow. Glue two or three buttons to the cone as desired.

Enjoy!

Spider Web Mug Rug Tutorial

5-DSCN2239Spider Web Mug Rug Tutorial

As the weather gets chillier, the cocoa starts coming out of the cupboard. In keeping with the season, make a spider web mug rug to add to the seasonal atmosphere. Make a set for your home, or give them as gifts to family and friends. From beginning to end, this mug rug took approximately 20 minutes to complete. If you are making several, cut out the pieces and construct in an assembly line fashion for faster completion. I used a solid black fabric for this project so that the lines of the spider web would pop. You could also use other fabric and thread colors for added whimsy.

Things You Will Need:

Card stock
Compass
Scissors
Black fabric
Ruler
Quilt batting
Straight pins
Tailor’s chalk
Sewing machine
Black thread
Iron
White thread

Step 1
Trace a 5-inch circle on card stock using a compass. Cut out the circle.

Step 2
Measure and cut two 6-inch squares from black fabric and one 6-inch square from quilt batting. Lay the quilt batting square on your work surface. Place the black fabric squares together with the right sides facing. Stack the fabric squares on the batting square. Pin through all layers to secure.

1-DSCN2227Step 3
Center the card stock circle on the top black square. Trace around the circle using tailor’s chalk.

2-DSCN2229Step 4
Sew the circle, stitching on the chalk line. Leave a 2 inch opening for turning. Cut out the circle approximately 1/8 inch outside the stitch line. At the opening of the circle cut at least a 1/2 inch from the chalk line. Turn the circle right side out and press. Hand sew the opening closed.

3-DSCN2232Step 5
Mark a dot in the center of the coaster using tailor’s chalk.

4-DSCN2233Starting on one edge of the coaster, top stitch across the center to the opposite edge using the white thread. This is across the diameter of the circle. Continue to top stitch across the coaster until you have a total of eight equal pie sections.

5-DSCN2239Step 6
The lines from the center of the circle to the outer edge are the radius lines. Connect the radius lines across the pie sections. Start at the center of one radius line on a pie section. You do not need to measure this, eyeballing is sufficient. Stitch straight across the pie section to the next radius line. Continue stitching across the center of each pie section until you reach the beginning line once again. For the sake of clarity, I’ll call the lines just made “horizontal” lines.

Step 7
Repeat step 6 half way between the horizontal lines and the center of the circle. Repeat one last time between the first horizontal lines and the outer edge of the circle.

If you don’t have a compass, there are other options for making a circle pattern. I used my Cricut Expression to cut out my circle. Measuring objects around the house may also yield a circle shape of the right diameter.

Enjoy!

Stenciled Fall Collage

8-DSCF2020Stenciled Fall Collage

Whew!! Three craft show weekends in a row! I’m finally able to take a breath and enjoy a little blogging, designing and crafting new things. I am sooo ready.

As promised, here is the process I used for my stenciled fall collage.

2-DSCF2007I used windows that already had broken glass for my initial collages, but since they were such good sellers at my shows, I ended up removing perfectly good glass from additional windows to make more.

1-DSCF2002I got out my stash of fall word stencils and placed them inside the frame of a window until I had a pleasing arrangement. I then took a picture of the arrangement so that I would remember when I was ready to actually stencil.

The frames were cleaned and dry brushed with orange paint. I added a lighter dry brushing of brown paint to tone down the brightness of the orange.

3-DSCF2011I turned the frame with the back side facing up and measured from one outside edge to the opposite one. After subtracting a couple of inches, I cut scrap wood to fill the window space.

4-DSCF2012Before attaching the boards, I dry brushed the fronts and backs using off white paint. The side edges were not painted. Each board was then glued and stapled to the window frame to secure.

6-DSCF2015Finally it was time to stencil. I repositioned my stencils. Determined the colors I would use for each one. Then I painted them. With most stencil projects, you really don’t know what you have until you remove your stencils. This one was no different, but I was very pleased with the results.

7-DSCF2019I added hangers to the back and it was done.

Enjoy!

Fall Leaf Bowl Fillers

Fall Leaf Bowl FillersAre you looking for natural fall decorations, but you’re not too excited about bringing bugs and dirt into your house? These fall leaf bowl fillers may be just the craft project for you. Yes, it does involve bringing in a couple of leaves to use as a pattern, but once your pattern is made, they can go back outside where they belong.

1-y212First off, head outside and find a leaf that has a good size and shape. Trace the leaf on the paper side of freezer paper.

2-y214Lay the traced freezer paper on the right side of your chosen fabric. Iron the fabric. This will temporarily adhere the freezer paper to the fabric.

I used upholstery samples that had been discontinued at a home improvement store, and some scrap pieces I had leftover from previous upholstery jobs. This project can really be made with any fabric, so there is no need to limit yourself to the fabric I used.

3-y213Sketch the veins of the leaf onto the traced paper leaf. Using a zig-zag stitch, sew over the sketched lines. Cut the fabric around the traced leaf shape. Peel the paper off the fabric.

Tip: Smaller (tighter) zig-zag stitches will make the needle-perforated paper easier to remove.

Lay a matching fabric scrap on your work surface with the wrong side facing up. Place the cut fabric leaf on the fabric with the right side facing up. Pin the pieces together. Sew the top leaf to the fabric 1/4 inch from the edge using a straight stitch. Leave a 2-inch opening on one edge.

4-y215Cut the excess fabric from the back using the front leaf as a guide. Stuff the leaf and continue to sew closed.

Fall Leaf Bowl FillersEnjoy!

Wood Siding Pumpkin Wall Hanger-Tutorial

DSCN1657Wood Siding Pumpkin

Make a pumpkin wall hanger using old wood siding or similar scrap wood from your wood pile. My fall decor has been created from a variety of old and recycled materials. I like the fact that I am keeping something out of the landfill and giving something old a new purpose. Besides, I think natural or rustic elements pull the harvest season together. This project is pretty much a freebie. You probably have most of the materials and supplies needed, but if you do need to buy something it will most likely only cost you pennies.

Things You Will Need:

Old wood siding
Measuring tape
Jig saw or miter saw
Drill and 1/16-inch drill bit
Orange acrylic paint
Paintbrush
Green acrylic paint
Sandpaper
1 1/2-inch wooden star
Brown acrylic paint
Black acrylic paint
Paper plate
Old toothbrush
Rusty baling wire
Wire cutters
Needle nose pliers

Cut an 8-inch length from old, weathered, wood siding using a jig saw or miter saw. My siding was 5 1/4-inches wide, but siding with broken edges can also be used. If siding is not available, thin paneling or old fence boards can be substituted. This will be your pumpkin’s body. From the same type of wood or paneling, cut a 2-inch wide by 3-inch long rectangle using a jig saw. This will be your pumpkin’s stem.

Lay the pumpkin body on your work surface. Rotate the pumpkin so that the short ends are at the top and bottom. Measure down a 1/2 inch from the top edge and in from the left 1 inch. Mark this measurement with a pencil. Measure down a 1/2 inch from the top and in from the right 1 inch. Mark the measurement. Drill through the marks using a 1/16-inch drill bit.

DSCN1653Paint both sides of the pumpkin body using orange acrylic paint. I like to paint the back of items that may be hung on a fence, peg, chair or some other perch where the back may be visible. Paint both sides of the stem using green acrylic paint. Paint additional coats for complete coverage. Allow the paint to dry. Sand the pieces to distress.

Lay the stem on your work surface with the back side facing up. Rotate the stem so that the short edges are at the top and bottom. Apply craft glue to the bottom 1 1/2 inches of the stem. Center the stem at the top center of the pumpkin, overlapping the end with the glue on the pumpkin’s front. Allow the remaining portion of the stem to extend above the pumpkin.

DSCN1654Paint a 1 1/2-inch wooden star using brown acrylic paint. Allow the paint to dry. Sand the star to distress. Apply craft glue to the back of the star. Place it on the front of the pumpkin, a couple inches above the bottom and off center.

Pour a small amount of black acrylic paint on a paper plate. Dip an old toothbrush in the paint. With the paint brush facing down, hold it over your pumpkin. Run your thumbnail over the bristles to splatter the paint onto the pumpkin’s surface. Repeat until the desired amount of splatter is reached. Allow the paint and glue to dry.

DSCN1656Cut a 15-inch length of rusty baling wire using wire cutters. Insert the ends of the wire through the drilled holes from the front of the pumpkin to the back. Pull the ends through approximately 2 inches. Bend the wire ends up and squeeze to secure using needle nose pliers. This is your hanger.

Add fall leaves and raffia tied around the stem for embellishments.

DSCN1657Enjoy!

Places I’m partying this week:

Monday:

Inspiration Monday
Make It Pretty Monday
Block Party
Craftastic Monday
Monday Funday

Tuesday:

Trash 2 Treasure Tuesday
The Inspiration Board
From Dream To Reality
The Scoop

Wednesday:

Wow Us Wednesdays
Wednesday’s Adorned From Above
{wow me} wednesday
A Little Bird Told Me
Wednesday Whatsits
Whatever Goes Wednesday
Time For A Party

Thursday:

Catch a Glimpse Thursday
The Project Stash Link Party
Under $100 Link Party
Creative Inspirations Linky Party
Lovely Ladies Linky
Celebrate It! Blog Party
Create It Thursday

Friday:

Feathered Nest Friday
Frugal Friday
Creativity Unleashed
Show and Tell Friday
I’m Lovin’ It
Simple and Sweet Fridays

Saturday:

Show and Tell Saturday
Get Schooled Saturday
Party Junk
Show-Licious Craft & Recipe Party

Sunday:

Think Pink Sunday
Submarine Sunday
That DIY Party
Nifty Thrifty Sunday
Sew Darn Crafty
Bouquet of Talent