Snowman Suitcase

DSCN2285Snowman Suitcase

I feel like I have been gone forever, but a lot happened since my last post. We moved! From Thanksgiving weekend until this past weekend we have moved, unpacked, put things away, decorated the house with normal and Christmas decor and I am more than halfway through with my Christmas baking. Whew!

Now it’s time to address my blog. I had so many tutorials I wanted to post for Christmas, but with only a week to go…, well, let’s just say I’ll post as many as I can before the big jolly guy comes down your chimney. ;)

Greet your holiday guests at the door with a snowman painted vintage suitcase. Its whimsical message will have all those who enter your house grinning with Christmas spirit.

DSCN2269Vintage suitcases are not difficult to find. Yard sales and auctions are great sources for picking them up for practically nothing.

Things You Will Need:

Vintage Suitcase
White acrylic latex paint
Paper plate
Sea sponge
Light pink paint
Stencil brush
Paper towel
1/2-inch dowel
Black acrylic paint
Ruler
Black paint pen
Orange acrylic paint
Paintbrush
Wooden skewer
Christmas or snowman fabric
Scissors
Craft glue

DSCN2273Pour white acrylic latex paint onto a paper plate. For large craft projects like this, I save money by using wall paint left over from previous home projects. Wet a sea sponge and wring it out well. Dip the sponge in the paint and sponge the paint over the surface of the suitcase. Paint everything, including the hinges and the latches. The handle does not need to be painted. Allow the paint to dry.

Pour a small amount of light pink paint on a paper plate. Wad up a paper towel. Dip a stencil brush into the paint. Scrub the wet brush into the towel. Working in a circular motion, rub large rounds cheeks onto the front of the suitcase. Note: Before painting, make sure the suitcase is positioned with the handle at the top.

DSCN2279Dip the end of a 1/2-inch dowel in black acrylic paint. Dot two eyes approximately 1/4 inch apart, just above the center of the suitcase front. Draw a large smile using a black paint pen.

Starting in the center of the face, using a paintbrush and orange acrylic paint, paint a carrot nose in a zigzag motion. Allow the paint to dry.

Starting half way up the left side of the suitcase front, working across the top and halfway down the right side of the suitcase front, write “In The Meadow We Will Build A Snowman” using a black paint pen. Dip the blunt end of a wood skewer into black acrylic paint. Dot the angles and intersections on each letter. Allow the paint to dry.

DSCN2282Rip a 1-inch-wide strip of Christmas or snowman fabric. Apply craft glue to the handle of the suitcase. Wrap the strip around the handle.

It does not matter what the inside of the suitcase looks like, as the case need not be opened. It can, however, be used to store Christmas decorations at the end of the season.

DSCN2285Enjoy!

Record Album Snowman Signs

2-DSCF2220Record Album Snowman Signs

I’m set up at a craft show today, but my husband is watching the booth while I make chicken noodle soup. Yum! I’ll be heading back in a few, but I wanted to share my latest project for the show.

I saw something similar to these on Pinterest, but I couldn’t locate a tutorial. No worries. I winged it.

They are made from old record albums.

1-DSCF2218I didn’t write a tutorial either, but they were not difficult. I have to say, I’m a little in love with painting on an album surface. The texture is kinda interesting.

If you are in Arkansas City, Kansas today, come say hello.

Here are the particulars.

Beta Sigma Phi’s 38th annual Sorority Craft Fair — 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Nov. 15, Agri-Business Building, 712 W. Washington Ave., Arkansas City.

Hurry, there isn’t much time left! ;)

Enjoy!

Scrap Wood Christmas Trees-COMPLETE Tutorial

3-DSCN7278Scrap Wood Christmas Trees-COMPLETE Tutorial

I first made these trees and the tutorial last year, but just realized I had never posted the complete tutorial on my blog. Yes, there are snippets and pics here and there, but not the full tute. I’m fixing that oversight today.

*******************

5-DSCN6755Do you have a scrap wood pile full of an assortment of boards left over from previous projects? Don’t let the difference in widths and lengths stop you from being creative. Use them together on one project to make a scrap wood Christmas tree to decorate your porch or yard.

Things You Will Need:

Scrap boards
Measuring tape
Chop saw
Hunter green acrylic paint
Paintbrush
Brown acrylic paint
Wood glue
12 wood screws
Drill, screwdriver bit and 3/32-inch bit
Star pattern
Pencil
Metal flashing scrap
Tin snips
Yellow-gold acrylic paint
Carpet tack
Rusty baling wire
Wire cutters
Needle nose pliers

1-DSCN7025Cut branches for the tree using scrap boards and a chop saw. You will need a 9-inch, a 14-inch, an 18-inch, a 24-inch, a 29-inch and a 32-inch-long board. Cut a 45-inch-long board for the tree trunk. The width of each board can be any size from 2 to 4 1/2 inches.

2-DSCN7028Dry brush one side of each branch using hunter green acrylic paint. Dry brush one side of the trunk using brown acrylic paint. Allow the paint to dry.

Lay the trunk on your work surface with the painted side facing up. Turn the trunk so that it is pointing away from you vertically. With the painted side of the branches facing up, horizontally place each one across the trunk starting with the shortest branch at the top and ending with the longest at the bottom.

Shift the top branch 5 inches down from the top and the bottom branch 9 inches up from the bottom of the trunk. Adjust and equally space the remaining branches between the top and bottom branches. Center each branch on the trunk.

Apply wood glue between each branch and the trunk. Allow the glue to dry.

Turn the tree over with the back side facing up. Run two wood screws per branch through the trunk and into the branches. Note: Make sure your screws are long enough to go through the trunk and into the branches, but not too long where they will poke through the front of the branches. If cracking wood is a concern, drill pilot holes for the screws before attaching.

3-DSCN7033Trace a star approximately 6 inches in diameter onto a scrap of metal flashing. Use tin snips to cut out the star. Paint one side of the star using yellow-gold acrylic paint.

Lay the tree with the front side facing up. Place the star on the trunk at the top of the tree. Attach the star to the trunk using a carpet tack through the center of the star.

4-DSCN7035Attach a wire hanger. Using a 3/32-inch drill bit, drill a hole on each end of the top branch 1 inch down from the top of the branch and 1 inch in from the ends. Cut a 24-inch length of rusty baling wire using wire cutters. Insert one end through each hole from the front of the branch to the back. Pull the wire ends through approximately 2 inches. Bend the loop of the hanger up. Twist the wire ends around the wire on the front of the branch using needle nose pliers.

5-DSCN7037Enjoy!

Foam Cone Candy Corn-Tutorial

7-DSCN2206-001Foam Cone Candy Corn

When the kids go back to school, I start getting serious about crafting for fall and winter holidays. More specifically, I begin stocking up on quick projects to sell at local craft sales. This whimsical candy corn couldn’t be more simple. Made with a foam cone as the base, it is quickly wrapped with ripped strips of fabric. Make several candy corns in a variety of sizes and display them in a basket, or as a centerpiece on a dining table.

Things You Will Need:

White cotton fabric
Ruler
Scissors
Foam cone
Craft glue
Yellow cotton fabric
Marking pen
Orange cotton fabric

1-DSCN2196-001Rip 1-inch-wide strips of white cotton fabric. The strips can be any length, making this a great project for using up scraps. The amount of strips needed will depend on the size of the cone you are using. If you are being frugal, start with a few and rip more as needed.

2-DSCN2197-001Apply craft glue to the top point of your cone and around the first inch below the top. Fold one end of a strip over the top, completely covering the tip. Turn the strip and wrap around the cone just below the top. This start will hide the tip and secure the end of the strip.

3-DSCN2198-001Add more glue to the sides of the cone. Continue to wrap strips, overlapping the side edges of the strips after each wrap around the cone. You can completely cover the sides of the cone with glue at this time, but to avoid a mess, I apply glue to the next couple of inches below the top, continue to wrap the strips and add more glue as needed. As you finish off one strip, continue to add more until the whole cone has been wrapped with white fabric. Do not cover the bottom of the cone.

Lay yellow cotton fabric with the wrong side facing up on your work surface. Stand the cone on the fabric. Using a marking pen, trace around the bottom of the cone, 1 inch from the cone’s edge. Cut out the circle of yellow fabric.

4-DSCN2200-001Apply craft glue to the flat bottom of the cone. Place the fabric circle on the bottom with the right side of the fabric facing out. Center the circle with an even amount extending past the edges of the cone’s bottom. Cut the extended fabric in slits spaced 1/4 inch apart. Apply glue to the back of each slit and fold them over the edge of the cone.

5-DSCN2203-001Rip 1-inch-wide strips of the yellow cotton fabric. Starting on the sides of the bottom edge, apply glue and wrap the strip around the cone. Continue wrapping up the cone in the same way as the white strips were attached. Stop when the bottom third of the cone has been wrapped in yellow.

6-DSCN2205-001Rip 1-inch-wide strips of orange fabric. Wrap and glue them over the middle third of the cone. Note: The top white third does not need to be wrapped again.

7-DSCN2206-001To embellish, wrap raffia, jute or a fabric strip around the center of the candy corn and tie into a bow. Glue two or three buttons to the cone as desired.

Enjoy!

Wanda Witch

07-DSCF1944Another gem I found during our recent move.

Years ago I made these witches with my neighbor when I lived in Denver. After I moved to Kansas I misplaced the pattern. My Denver neighbor sent me a copy of her pattern and I started to make them again. Before I could finish them, life happened and they were put away again. I had completely forgotten about them until I made this move and found the parts again.

10-DSCF1957The pattern I used was from the October 1993 Crafts N’ Things magazine.

The bodies, legs and arms were all stitched and stuffed, but they were still just parts. I finished attaching everything and added the faces. The pattern used appliques for the eyes and mouth. I painted mine instead. Probably a good thing as I don’t think they can be purchased anymore.

01-DSCF1914They look a bit like aliens in this photo. :)

02-DSCF1919The clothes pieces were also cut and ready to go. Woo Hoo! That’s half the battle with sewing projects. All I had to do was stitch them together.

03-DSCF1924I made primitive buttons using Sculpey clay.

09-DSCF1952They were nice finishing touches for the dress…

08-DSCF1949…and the shoes.

06-DSCF1942The pattern called for excelsior hair, which I had used with the witches I made previously, but I just wasn’t feeling it this time. I used a mixture of gray, black and white curly doll hair. I also added a roll of black tulle to the brim of the hat.

05-DSCF1939Enjoy!