Scrappy Quilt Bracelets

21-DSCF2694Scrappy Quilt Bracelets

16-DSCN4483You may remember my scrappy fabric tags I made a couple of years ago. I loved that idea.

02-DSCF2577I have been working on expanding on that idea by turning scrap cutter quilts into wearable art…more specifically I wanted to see if I couldn’t turn these scraps into bracelets.

I’m a little embarrassed to say that each step took a little bit of refining until I was able to get a consistent result with each one that I tried. I almost threw in the towel a few times, but the time wasted and each failed attempt just made me even more determined to make it work.

My first fail was cutting the strip for the bracelet. I didn’t take into account the quilting stitches on the quilt. Quilting stitches hold a top, middle and bottom layer together. When I cut a small strip, it basically peeled apart in large areas. Stitching on vintage quilts is also unreliable. There were areas where the seams came apart. AARGH!

01-DSCF2580My fix for those problems was to top stitch over the surface of a scrap of quilt. I emptied a spool of thread while meandering in a scribble design.

03-DSCF2586I was then able to cut my bracelet strips without them falling apart.

04-DSCF2601The next step was getting the words onto the strip. I decided to use my character stitches on my sewing machine. That worked the first couple of times and then…AARGH! Old quilts can be kinda lumpy and my machine didn’t want to stitch the tiny letters over the lumps. I finally tried stitching the words on muslin. Eureka!06-DSCF2608

I then stitched the the muslin to the strip in my favorite shabby way.

15-DSCF2673If you want to try this and you don’t have character stitches on your machine I also tried it with stamps as an alternative.

07-DSCF2616I embellished around the words with little pearl beads.

The next failure was the buttonhole. Yep, for the same reason the character stitches didn’t want to stitch…those !@#$% lumps. AARGH!

Deep breath. I was not going to let this project beat me!

17-DSCF2682Light bulb! I finally had good luck with a button/loop closure. Elastic cord formed the loop.

09-DSCF2625With the bracelet strip placed on canvas fabric and the knot of the loop inserted under one end, I stitched around the edges of the bracelet a couple of times. Just like the shabby tags, I didn’t stitch perfect lines.

13-DSCF2637After stitching the canvas backing to the bracelet I trimmed the excess away and added a button to complete the closure function.

14-DSCF2686And then like eating potato chips, I couldn’t stop at just one.

Enjoy!

Red and White Quilt Valentine Charm Pillows

08-DSCF2541Red and White Quilt Valentine Charm Pillows

My husband and I went to an auction this past weekend and didn’t get anything that we went there for. That’s okay! We didn’t leave empty handed.

01-DSCF2518My hand went up for this fantastic vintage quilt. The colors and the basic patch square design had the wheels turning in my head. Classic country, Americana accents and, of course, Valentine’s Day were just a few of the ideas that came to mind. Since Valentine’s Day is right around the corner, I decided to start there.

02-DSCF2575I dug out a couple of heart shapes from my pattern stash. I love the shape of the large heart. The humps are kinda squared and the center has a wider, deeper valley.

03-DSCF2522I make a lot of bowl fillers and pillows, but theses little hearts fell in between the sizes I normally do for either one. I still thought the size was charming, so I am calling these “charm” pillows.

10-DSCF2544They can still be placed in bowls or baskets, but they also look sweet on a shelf or tucked up next to a regular size throw pillow in a chair or on a bed.

04-DSCF2530I used the smaller heart to cut out red velvet hearts. I appliqued them to the pillows, along with a flowers I snipped from doilies.

11-DSCF2547Old pearl beads stitched to the center of the flower and an old button stitched to the appliqued heart completed the charm.

I still have some of the quilt left for the country and Americana ideas I mentioned. Stay tuned. ;)

Enjoy!

Snowman Suitcase

DSCN2285Snowman Suitcase

I feel like I have been gone forever, but a lot happened since my last post. We moved! From Thanksgiving weekend until this past weekend we have moved, unpacked, put things away, decorated the house with normal and Christmas decor and I am more than halfway through with my Christmas baking. Whew!

Now it’s time to address my blog. I had so many tutorials I wanted to post for Christmas, but with only a week to go…, well, let’s just say I’ll post as many as I can before the big jolly guy comes down your chimney. ;)

Greet your holiday guests at the door with a snowman painted vintage suitcase. Its whimsical message will have all those who enter your house grinning with Christmas spirit.

DSCN2269Vintage suitcases are not difficult to find. Yard sales and auctions are great sources for picking them up for practically nothing.

Things You Will Need:

Vintage Suitcase
White acrylic latex paint
Paper plate
Sea sponge
Light pink paint
Stencil brush
Paper towel
1/2-inch dowel
Black acrylic paint
Ruler
Black paint pen
Orange acrylic paint
Paintbrush
Wooden skewer
Christmas or snowman fabric
Scissors
Craft glue

DSCN2273Pour white acrylic latex paint onto a paper plate. For large craft projects like this, I save money by using wall paint left over from previous home projects. Wet a sea sponge and wring it out well. Dip the sponge in the paint and sponge the paint over the surface of the suitcase. Paint everything, including the hinges and the latches. The handle does not need to be painted. Allow the paint to dry.

Pour a small amount of light pink paint on a paper plate. Wad up a paper towel. Dip a stencil brush into the paint. Scrub the wet brush into the towel. Working in a circular motion, rub large rounds cheeks onto the front of the suitcase. Note: Before painting, make sure the suitcase is positioned with the handle at the top.

DSCN2279Dip the end of a 1/2-inch dowel in black acrylic paint. Dot two eyes approximately 1/4 inch apart, just above the center of the suitcase front. Draw a large smile using a black paint pen.

Starting in the center of the face, using a paintbrush and orange acrylic paint, paint a carrot nose in a zigzag motion. Allow the paint to dry.

Starting half way up the left side of the suitcase front, working across the top and halfway down the right side of the suitcase front, write “In The Meadow We Will Build A Snowman” using a black paint pen. Dip the blunt end of a wood skewer into black acrylic paint. Dot the angles and intersections on each letter. Allow the paint to dry.

DSCN2282Rip a 1-inch-wide strip of Christmas or snowman fabric. Apply craft glue to the handle of the suitcase. Wrap the strip around the handle.

It does not matter what the inside of the suitcase looks like, as the case need not be opened. It can, however, be used to store Christmas decorations at the end of the season.

DSCN2285Enjoy!

Record Album Snowman Signs

2-DSCF2220Record Album Snowman Signs

I’m set up at a craft show today, but my husband is watching the booth while I make chicken noodle soup. Yum! I’ll be heading back in a few, but I wanted to share my latest project for the show.

I saw something similar to these on Pinterest, but I couldn’t locate a tutorial. No worries. I winged it.

They are made from old record albums.

1-DSCF2218I didn’t write a tutorial either, but they were not difficult. I have to say, I’m a little in love with painting on an album surface. The texture is kinda interesting.

If you are in Arkansas City, Kansas today, come say hello.

Here are the particulars.

Beta Sigma Phi’s 38th annual Sorority Craft Fair — 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Nov. 15, Agri-Business Building, 712 W. Washington Ave., Arkansas City.

Hurry, there isn’t much time left! ;)

Enjoy!

Scrap Wood Christmas Trees-COMPLETE Tutorial

3-DSCN7278Scrap Wood Christmas Trees-COMPLETE Tutorial

I first made these trees and the tutorial last year, but just realized I had never posted the complete tutorial on my blog. Yes, there are snippets and pics here and there, but not the full tute. I’m fixing that oversight today.

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5-DSCN6755Do you have a scrap wood pile full of an assortment of boards left over from previous projects? Don’t let the difference in widths and lengths stop you from being creative. Use them together on one project to make a scrap wood Christmas tree to decorate your porch or yard.

Things You Will Need:

Scrap boards
Measuring tape
Chop saw
Hunter green acrylic paint
Paintbrush
Brown acrylic paint
Wood glue
12 wood screws
Drill, screwdriver bit and 3/32-inch bit
Star pattern
Pencil
Metal flashing scrap
Tin snips
Yellow-gold acrylic paint
Carpet tack
Rusty baling wire
Wire cutters
Needle nose pliers

1-DSCN7025Cut branches for the tree using scrap boards and a chop saw. You will need a 9-inch, a 14-inch, an 18-inch, a 24-inch, a 29-inch and a 32-inch-long board. Cut a 45-inch-long board for the tree trunk. The width of each board can be any size from 2 to 4 1/2 inches.

2-DSCN7028Dry brush one side of each branch using hunter green acrylic paint. Dry brush one side of the trunk using brown acrylic paint. Allow the paint to dry.

Lay the trunk on your work surface with the painted side facing up. Turn the trunk so that it is pointing away from you vertically. With the painted side of the branches facing up, horizontally place each one across the trunk starting with the shortest branch at the top and ending with the longest at the bottom.

Shift the top branch 5 inches down from the top and the bottom branch 9 inches up from the bottom of the trunk. Adjust and equally space the remaining branches between the top and bottom branches. Center each branch on the trunk.

Apply wood glue between each branch and the trunk. Allow the glue to dry.

Turn the tree over with the back side facing up. Run two wood screws per branch through the trunk and into the branches. Note: Make sure your screws are long enough to go through the trunk and into the branches, but not too long where they will poke through the front of the branches. If cracking wood is a concern, drill pilot holes for the screws before attaching.

3-DSCN7033Trace a star approximately 6 inches in diameter onto a scrap of metal flashing. Use tin snips to cut out the star. Paint one side of the star using yellow-gold acrylic paint.

Lay the tree with the front side facing up. Place the star on the trunk at the top of the tree. Attach the star to the trunk using a carpet tack through the center of the star.

4-DSCN7035Attach a wire hanger. Using a 3/32-inch drill bit, drill a hole on each end of the top branch 1 inch down from the top of the branch and 1 inch in from the ends. Cut a 24-inch length of rusty baling wire using wire cutters. Insert one end through each hole from the front of the branch to the back. Pull the wire ends through approximately 2 inches. Bend the loop of the hanger up. Twist the wire ends around the wire on the front of the branch using needle nose pliers.

5-DSCN7037Enjoy!