New Fall Craft Show Projects-2015

DSCF5368We have participated in craft shows for three weekends in a row. Thankfully, this weekend we can take a break.

After each craft show I was either making more of things that had sold or making new things to fill in the holes from past sales. The shows were good, but keeping up with more projects was quite a whirlwind of activity. I didn’t take time to get pics of before or during steps of the new things, but I did make sure I snapped finished photos.

DSCF5345Fence Board Snowmen

I should have thought these through a little bit better when I designed them. After they were finished and I was loading them, I realized they were about an inch and a half too tall to stand in the trailer. I had to lay them down to get them in. (sigh) I will definitely be tweaking this project next time I make them.

DSCF5348Snowman Wall Hangings

The snowmen were made using a white chenille bedspread. For something a little different with the wood construction, I chose to put the horizontal wood braces on the front.

DSCF5353Giddy Up Signs

I’ve made these “Giddy Up” signs before, but it’s been a few years. They were made using the inner panels from old doors.

DSCF5357Stenciled Bench

This was a transformation from a yard sale find. A little paint, a little sanding and a little stenciling.

There were many more projects that were just remakes on things I had sold a lot of or sold out of. Most of those I had already posted on my blog in the past so I didn’t take new pics.

DSCF5362My front porch finally got a transformation into fall. I hauled a screen door home from my storage unit to add height to the display. I really like the way it looks. It’s kinda perfect that it’s black too.

Happy Fall Y’all!

Enjoy!

More Witchy Wisdom

More Witchy WisdomWitchy Wisdom

It’s that time of year again. Time to craft in preparation for fall craft shows.

These witchy signs have been a big hit the last couple of years so I headed out to the woodpile to find wood that had potential for making more. I’ve made these with pallet boards, wood chair seats and cupboard doors, but this time I used scraps from my brother’s new fence.

DSCF4876He had quite a few pieces that were already cut to the same size, so I didn’t have much cutting to get them prepared.

DSCF4877I try to buy gallons of paint colors that I use a lot of. I’ve used this same orange paint for about three years. Sigh…it’s almost gone so I’ll need to be buying more soon.

DSCF4902The stencil was made using my Cricut. It’s the same one I have used since the first sign I made. It’s just card stock, but it has held up well.

DSCF4944I tried something new this year. I had some black raffia in my stash so I used it for the witch brooms. In the past I have used the natural raffia. I really like them in black.

DSCF4953The last touch was attaching green raffia to the rusty wire handle.

Enjoy!

Primitive Pumpkin Shutter

5-DSCN2316-001Primitive Pumpkin Shutter

I love turning things that end up on the curb into fun and whimsical seasonal decorations. Paint an old window shutter into a primitive pumpkin shutter for fall and Halloween decor. Not a painter? No problem. This is a primitive project, and crisp straight lines are not required. Except for the drying time of the paint, this shutter can be completed very quickly.

Things You Will Need:

Old window shutter
Tools for removing hardware
Orange acrylic paint
Paper plate
Sea sponge
Black acrylic paint
Stencil brush
Kitchen sponges
Permanent marker
Ruler
Scissors
Yellow-gold acrylic paint
Artist’s paintbrush
Green acrylic paint

1-DSCN2274-001Remove any hinges, knobs and hooks from your shutter and clean well.

Pour orange acrylic paint onto a paper plate. Wet a sea sponge and wring it out well. Dip the sponge in the paint and sponge it over the front, back and side surfaces of the shutter. Do not worry about complete coverage. This project allows for the original surface to peek through. Allow the paint to dry.

2-DSCN2286-001Many window shutters have a spine on the front that opens and closes the slats. For this project, this side will be the back. You want the flattest side to paint your pumpkin on. Lay the shutter with the flat side facing up. This is now the front. Pour black paint onto a paper plate. Dip the sea sponge in the paint and dab it on the front and sides of the shutter. The back will remain orange. Allow the paint to dry.

4-DSCN2301-001Using a large stencil brush, pounce orange paint in a long oval that covers most of the front surface on the shutter. This is your pumpkin shape. Allow the paint to dry.

3-DSCN2294-001Trace a 3-inch-tall triangle with a 2-inch base on a kitchen sponge using a permanent marking pen. Cut out the shape using scissors. Raggedy edges are fine. Draw a 1 1/2-inch-wide by 4 1/4-inch long rectangle on another kitchen sponge. Round the corners of the rectangle. Cut out the rectangle.

Dip the triangle into black acrylic paint. Stamp the triangle in the center of the pumpkin shape. This is the nose. Using the triangle and black paint, apply the eyes above the nose as desired. Dip the rectangle sponge into yellow-gold acrylic paint and stamp a mouth below the nose. Allow the paint to dry.

Dip an artist’s paintbrush into black acrylic paint. Paint a thin line around the mouth. This is supposed to look primitive, so perfect lines are not necessary. Paint a thin line across the center of the mouth. Paint vertical lines across the center line to create the teeth. Allow the paint to dry.

Using green acrylic paint, paint a stem at the top of the pumpkin.

5-DSCN2316-001My shutter was 6 1/2 inches wide by 20 inches long. This primitive project allows for altering and adjusting the steps to fit on any size shutter.

The finished shutter will lean against a wall or furniture, as it will not lay flat because of the spine on the back.

Enjoy!

Foam Cone Candy Corn-Tutorial

7-DSCN2206-001Foam Cone Candy Corn

When the kids go back to school, I start getting serious about crafting for fall and winter holidays. More specifically, I begin stocking up on quick projects to sell at local craft sales. This whimsical candy corn couldn’t be more simple. Made with a foam cone as the base, it is quickly wrapped with ripped strips of fabric. Make several candy corns in a variety of sizes and display them in a basket, or as a centerpiece on a dining table.

Things You Will Need:

White cotton fabric
Ruler
Scissors
Foam cone
Craft glue
Yellow cotton fabric
Marking pen
Orange cotton fabric

1-DSCN2196-001Rip 1-inch-wide strips of white cotton fabric. The strips can be any length, making this a great project for using up scraps. The amount of strips needed will depend on the size of the cone you are using. If you are being frugal, start with a few and rip more as needed.

2-DSCN2197-001Apply craft glue to the top point of your cone and around the first inch below the top. Fold one end of a strip over the top, completely covering the tip. Turn the strip and wrap around the cone just below the top. This start will hide the tip and secure the end of the strip.

3-DSCN2198-001Add more glue to the sides of the cone. Continue to wrap strips, overlapping the side edges of the strips after each wrap around the cone. You can completely cover the sides of the cone with glue at this time, but to avoid a mess, I apply glue to the next couple of inches below the top, continue to wrap the strips and add more glue as needed. As you finish off one strip, continue to add more until the whole cone has been wrapped with white fabric. Do not cover the bottom of the cone.

Lay yellow cotton fabric with the wrong side facing up on your work surface. Stand the cone on the fabric. Using a marking pen, trace around the bottom of the cone, 1 inch from the cone’s edge. Cut out the circle of yellow fabric.

4-DSCN2200-001Apply craft glue to the flat bottom of the cone. Place the fabric circle on the bottom with the right side of the fabric facing out. Center the circle with an even amount extending past the edges of the cone’s bottom. Cut the extended fabric in slits spaced 1/4 inch apart. Apply glue to the back of each slit and fold them over the edge of the cone.

5-DSCN2203-001Rip 1-inch-wide strips of the yellow cotton fabric. Starting on the sides of the bottom edge, apply glue and wrap the strip around the cone. Continue wrapping up the cone in the same way as the white strips were attached. Stop when the bottom third of the cone has been wrapped in yellow.

6-DSCN2205-001Rip 1-inch-wide strips of orange fabric. Wrap and glue them over the middle third of the cone. Note: The top white third does not need to be wrapped again.

7-DSCN2206-001To embellish, wrap raffia, jute or a fabric strip around the center of the candy corn and tie into a bow. Glue two or three buttons to the cone as desired.

Enjoy!

Spider Web Mug Rug Tutorial

5-DSCN2239Spider Web Mug Rug Tutorial

As the weather gets chillier, the cocoa starts coming out of the cupboard. In keeping with the season, make a spider web mug rug to add to the seasonal atmosphere. Make a set for your home, or give them as gifts to family and friends. From beginning to end, this mug rug took approximately 20 minutes to complete. If you are making several, cut out the pieces and construct in an assembly line fashion for faster completion. I used a solid black fabric for this project so that the lines of the spider web would pop. You could also use other fabric and thread colors for added whimsy.

Things You Will Need:

Card stock
Compass
Scissors
Black fabric
Ruler
Quilt batting
Straight pins
Tailor’s chalk
Sewing machine
Black thread
Iron
White thread

Step 1
Trace a 5-inch circle on card stock using a compass. Cut out the circle.

Step 2
Measure and cut two 6-inch squares from black fabric and one 6-inch square from quilt batting. Lay the quilt batting square on your work surface. Place the black fabric squares together with the right sides facing. Stack the fabric squares on the batting square. Pin through all layers to secure.

1-DSCN2227Step 3
Center the card stock circle on the top black square. Trace around the circle using tailor’s chalk.

2-DSCN2229Step 4
Sew the circle, stitching on the chalk line. Leave a 2 inch opening for turning. Cut out the circle approximately 1/8 inch outside the stitch line. At the opening of the circle cut at least a 1/2 inch from the chalk line. Turn the circle right side out and press. Hand sew the opening closed.

3-DSCN2232Step 5
Mark a dot in the center of the coaster using tailor’s chalk.

4-DSCN2233Starting on one edge of the coaster, top stitch across the center to the opposite edge using the white thread. This is across the diameter of the circle. Continue to top stitch across the coaster until you have a total of eight equal pie sections.

5-DSCN2239Step 6
The lines from the center of the circle to the outer edge are the radius lines. Connect the radius lines across the pie sections. Start at the center of one radius line on a pie section. You do not need to measure this, eyeballing is sufficient. Stitch straight across the pie section to the next radius line. Continue stitching across the center of each pie section until you reach the beginning line once again. For the sake of clarity, I’ll call the lines just made “horizontal” lines.

Step 7
Repeat step 6 half way between the horizontal lines and the center of the circle. Repeat one last time between the first horizontal lines and the outer edge of the circle.

If you don’t have a compass, there are other options for making a circle pattern. I used my Cricut Expression to cut out my circle. Measuring objects around the house may also yield a circle shape of the right diameter.

Enjoy!