Fence Wood Flags

9-DSCF4435Fence Wood Flags

My brother has been replacing his fence and I have been lucky enough to be the recipient of the old wood, as well as scraps of the new wood.

1-DSCF4406These flags were created from the new wood scraps because most of them were already cut to the size I wanted. The only thing I needed to cut was the square for the blue field.

2-DSCF4410I decided that two pieces of wood made the perfect size for the flag, so the white stripe was painted to overlap both pieces.

3-DSCF4412Masking was essential for a nice crisp stripe.

4-DSCF4413After basing with the red, white and blue paint, then adding a stenciled star on the blue field…,

5-DSCF4417…I aged each piece with stain. Wow! That new wood sucked up the stain. Only six flags used up more than half a quart.

6-DSCF4424I wanted something a little bit different than my normal sign construction, so I connected the flag boards with rusty baling wire.

7-DSCF4430The blue fields were attached with my staple gun.

9-DSCF4435After adding the hanger, they still looked kinda blah so I added an old bottle cap to the center of the star and ripped a strip from old blue jeans to tie around the hanger.

8-DSCF4432Happy 4th of July!

Enjoy!

Shabby Chic Train Cases

9-train caseShabby Chic Train Cases

1-train caseRestyle a vintage train case into a shabby chic case for organizing your vanity or corralling your photos and journals. This romantic container could also be used to display small vintage collectibles.

*This is a project I had originally published on FaveCrafts.

Things You Will Need:

Train case (overnight bag)
Craft knife
Rags
Light-colored, flat latex paint
Paintbrush
Sandpaper
Book pages
Ruler
Decoupage medium
Sponge brush
Measuring tape
3 1/2-inch wide lace
Scissors
Satin ribbon scrap
Key
Craft glue
Small flowers

2-train caseRemove the lining from the inside of your train case. The lining is glued in, so in most cases simply prying up an edge with a knife will allow you to grasp it and pull it out. If you encounter stubborn areas, cut it loose with a craft knife. Discard the lining.

Close the case. Use a wet rag on the outside of the case to remove dust and dirt.

3-train casePaint all sides of the case, including the hinges and latches, using a light-colored, flat latex paint. Allow the paint to dry and repeat with additional coats if necessary. Since old cases tend to soak up a lot of paint, I like to use wall paint left over from previous home improvement projects. It’s a great way to use up that little bit left in the can and it prevents the added cost of purchasing a large quantity of craft paint.

Undo the latches on the case and lightly paint over the areas that didn’t get painted when the latches were closed.

Lightly sand the surface and the edges of the case. Lightly sand over the metal of the latches and hinges. Wipe away the sanding dust using a dry rag.

Insert the blade of a craft knife in the gap between the lid and the case bottom. Allowing the gap to guide you, cut through the dry paint that is gluing the lid closed. After you have cut all the way around the case you will be able to pull open the lid.

Rip old book pages into 2 to 3-inch pieces. I used ripped book pages left over from other projects. They came from a variety of old books. Even though they didn’t match, the contrast of different book pages added interest to the project.

4-train caseWorking in one small area at a time, apply decoupage medium to the inside of the train case using a sponge brush. Place a book page piece over the medium. Smooth out the wrinkles and seal with a layer of medium over the paper. Repeat with additional book page pieces, overlapping their edges, until the inside of the case and lid has been completely covered. Allow the decoupage medium to dry.

5-train caseUsing a measuring tape, measure around the horizontal circumference of the case and add 24 inches. Using this measurement, cut a length of 3 1/2-inch wide lace. Wrap the lace around the case and tie the ends in a bow on the front.

7-train caseCut a 10-inch scrap of satin ribbon that coordinates with your paint color. Thread a key on the ribbon and tie the ribbon around the handle of the case. Using craft glue, attach a small flower to the key. Arrange and glue additional flowers to the lace bow.

8-train caseEnjoy!

Shabby Chic Shelf

14-DSCF3994Shabby Chic Shelf

09-DSCF3950Another garage sale find. Oops, this picture was taken after I had fixed structural issues. It was in pieces because it was missing several screws.

10-DSCF3971I decided to make it a match to the shabby chic iron vanity chair from my previous post. With that in mind, the same painting technique was used.

11-DSCF3973Both baskets came with the shelf. The top basket was lined, but the green checked fabric didn’t fit in with my shabby chic vision. Using the old lining as a pattern, I made a new one using white eyelet fabric and eyelet ruffle trim.

13-DSCF3987Another singed flower that matched the chair was also added to the basket.

15-DSCF3980Here are the two pieces together.

Enjoy!

Shabby Chic Iron Vanity Chair

08-DSCF3988Shabby Chic Iron Vanity Chair

01-DSCF3937This was another find from my garage sale treasure hunt in Rose Hill, Kansas.

03-DSCF3945I got it for a steal, mostly because it would tip over backwards when someone sat in it. I knew immediately what the problem was. Unfortunately you can’t see what the problem was in these pics because I got excited and fixed it before grabbing the camera.

02-DSCF3941Basically, the problem was the braces between the legs. I took them off, turned them around and reattached them to the chair. This adjusted the legs to the way they were supposed to be. Score!

05-DSCF3962The chair had such cute lines, but I knew I would like it better with a shabby chic look. The technique I used wasn’t very technical.

04-DSCF3956I pounced white paint onto the iron and then painted a layer of pearl medium over the white.

06-DSCF3966I recovered the seat using white eyelet fabric. It was already quite a transformation, but it just didn’t seem done.

07-DSCF3984I decided to add a bit more girly-girl frill. I made a singed flower with some white lining fabric, lace and pearl beads.

08-DSCF3988It’s tied to the front of the chair with crinkled seam binding ribbon, but that’s just for the photo. It will be turned to the back of the chair so that it doesn’t get squished when the chair is being used.

Enjoy!

Bentwood Cafe Chairs-Restyle

3-DSCF3923Bentwood Cafe Chairs

1-DSCF3905My husband and I found these cute chairs at the Rose Hill, Kansas citywide garage sales. They were in very good shape, but because they were placed on separate sides of the yard, we didn’t realize until we got them home that they were not a matched pair. Close, but no cigar. The chair on the right it slightly shorter than the other, the seat is a tiny bit smaller and the curvature of the bentwood on the back is not quite the same.

No worries. They most likely will never be set beside each other. The differences will not be noticeable.

Since they were in such great condition, the most I had to do to get them ready for transformation was to tighten a few screws, clean and sand.

2-DSCF3916Then it was time for my mad scientist skills to come out. I had my heart set on a certain color of paint, but I didn’t have it. It took me a while, but I managed to mix a few colors that I had to get the shade I wanted. I just love this color.

5-DSCF3926A light dry brushing of white…

4-DSCF3924…completed the look I was going for.

3-DSCF3923They look so fresh and happy.

Enjoy!