Old Stencil Ornaments

DSCF6121Old Stencil Ornaments

There’s always something that needs a transformation and when I went through my stencil suitcase I realized I just didn’t use these old brown stencil templates anymore. I still like the vintage look of them, but I have newer stencils that work for actual stenciling. Not one to get rid of anything, I decided to try a little restyle.

It took me a few tries to get the look I was going for, but I think I nailed it.

DSCF5672The fronts were dry brushed with white paint. While the paint was still wet, they got a dusting of crystal glitter.

I “painted” the backs with glue and pressed them onto burlap scraps. When the glue dried I cut the burlap around the edges of the stencils.

DSCF5683A line of craft glue was added around the edges, then the glue was sprinkled with silver glitter. I left them alone for a bit to dry. Well, that’s what I told myself, but really it was because I didn’t know where to go from there.

DSCF6126And then it hit me by accident. A happy accident. I was working on another project and bits and pieces happened to fall on the stencils. I liked the way they looked, so I kinda went with it.

DSCF6124A punched hole with a ribbon hanger…

DSCF6128…and a bow completed the look.


Pine Cone Christmas Ornaments

DSCF6024-001Pine Cone Christmas Ornaments

It seems like this time of year gets more hectic every year, but I think I can finally see the end of the tunnel. I have almost completed my shopping, participated in my last craft show of the season, have gotten caught up on writing commitments and am ready to bake up a storm.

Speaking of writing commitments, I want to share my pine cone tree ornament tutorials.

DSCF6012-001Angel Pine Cone

DSCF6018-001Snowman Pine Cone

DSCF6010-001Snow Glittered Pine Cone

I had pine cones littering my lawn a couple of months ago. I gathered them as they fell and threw them in a pot on the deck. I wasn’t sure what I was going to do with them, but it sure beat having them fly like small missiles every time my husband mowed the lawn.

You can find the article with full tutorials here.


Vintage Hankie Chicks

6-DSCF2810Vintage Hankie Chicks

I’ve got spring fever. Yep, I said it. I also knocked on wood just now in hopes that I don’t jinx it. We have had a few days of mild weather and I am excited. I shouldn’t be…it seems like a good portion of the country is bracing for a doozy of a winter storm. We’re bound to get some kind of trickle down from that. :(

8-DSCF2818Rather than dwell on what could happen, I am enjoying what we have now. I dug out my vintage hankie collection to make spring chicks. I think they will look cute for Easter and decorated spring vignettes.

2-DSCF2699I have lots of hankies to choose from. They’ve come from grandmas, aunts, yard sales, auctions and thrift stores. I pretty much collect them from every possible place they may be available.

01-DSCF2642I think the colors and designs are more interesting and unique than fabric by the yard, not to mention the memories or conversations they will evoke.

02-DSCF2644I was able to get three chicks from one hankie. I could have gotten more, but I focused my cut pieces on the best design areas on the hankies.

03-DSCF2650I used one pink hankie for the combs on all of my chicks, and I used a scrap of yellow fabric for the beaks.

7-DSCF2814The eyes were beads from old broken jewelry.


Fall Leaf Bowl Fillers

Fall Leaf Bowl FillersAre you looking for natural fall decorations, but you’re not too excited about bringing bugs and dirt into your house? These fall leaf bowl fillers may be just the craft project for you. Yes, it does involve bringing in a couple of leaves to use as a pattern, but once your pattern is made, they can go back outside where they belong.

1-y212First off, head outside and find a leaf that has a good size and shape. Trace the leaf on the paper side of freezer paper.

2-y214Lay the traced freezer paper on the right side of your chosen fabric. Iron the fabric. This will temporarily adhere the freezer paper to the fabric.

I used upholstery samples that had been discontinued at a home improvement store, and some scrap pieces I had leftover from previous upholstery jobs. This project can really be made with any fabric, so there is no need to limit yourself to the fabric I used.

3-y213Sketch the veins of the leaf onto the traced paper leaf. Using a zig-zag stitch, sew over the sketched lines. Cut the fabric around the traced leaf shape. Peel the paper off the fabric.

Tip: Smaller (tighter) zig-zag stitches will make the needle-perforated paper easier to remove.

Lay a matching fabric scrap on your work surface with the wrong side facing up. Place the cut fabric leaf on the fabric with the right side facing up. Pin the pieces together. Sew the top leaf to the fabric 1/4 inch from the edge using a straight stitch. Leave a 2-inch opening on one edge.

4-y215Cut the excess fabric from the back using the front leaf as a guide. Stuff the leaf and continue to sew closed.

Fall Leaf Bowl FillersEnjoy!

Chenille Bedspread Candy Cane Bowl Filler-Tutorial

y871I have posted about this project before, but I have never posted the entire tutorial on my blog. Since this is such a good seller at my craft shows, I thought it was time to share the specifics. :)

Vintage linens offer an unexpected fabric for new sewing projects. I especially love chenille bedspreads. I use them quite a bit in my craft designs, but I am often left with small scraps that I just can’t bring myself to toss. This primitive candy cane bowl filler is the perfect solution for putting those scraps to good use. Made with primitively appliqued stripes and exposed seams, this bowl filler works up very quickly.

Things You Will Need:

Card stock
Marking pen
White chenille bedspread
Red fabric
Straight pins
Sewing machine

y872Trace a candy cane shape on card stock that is approximately 1 1/2 inches wide by 7 inches tall. This measurement does not need to be exact. You can draw your shape free hand or enlarge a “J” from a favorite font on your computer and print it out. Cut out the shape. This is your pattern.

Lay a white chenille bedspread on your work surface with the wrong side facing up. Place the candy cane pattern on the chenille and lightly trace around it with a marking pen. This is the the back of the fabric, but the cane is sewn with edges exposed, so you will want to cut away the pen marks. Cut out the shape just inside the marked lines.

Cut six 1-inch-wide by 2 1/2-inch-long strips of red fabric.

y873Place the chenille candy cane on your work surface with the right side facing up. Place the red fabric strips across the width of the cane and spaced evenly from one end of the cane to the other. Pin the strips in place.

1-DSCF1869Top stitch the edges of the red strips across the width of the cane, as close to the edges as possible. Trim the ends of the strips even with the cane. This is the front of your candy cane bowl filler.

2-DSCF1875Lay your white chenille bedspread on your work surface with the wrong side up. Place the candy cane front on the chenille with the red stripes facing up. Pin the candy cane to the chenille.

3-DSCF1882Sew around the edges of the cane using a 1/4-inch seam allowance. Do not sew the bottom end of the cane.

Cut out the shape using the front candy cane as your guide. Do not turn the cane. The side on the outside is the right side. Stuff the candy cane. Sew the end closed in the same way as the other edges of the candy cane.

y871Rip a 1-inch wide by 20-inch long strip of red fabric. Wrap the strip around the candy cane and tie into a bow. Trim the ends.

For a variety of candy cane flavors, choose other colors to create the stripes.