Crafts to Make With Old Window Shutters

DSCF8184-001Crafts to Make With Old Window Shutters

Somehow I had accumulated quite a pile of window shutters, so when an opportunity to write an article on projects to make with window shutters came along, I was thrilled. It was just the incentive I needed to reduce my pile.

Click on this sentence or any highlighted text to open the article for the project instructions.

Primitive Flag Shutter
If you are looking for a new decoration for the Fourth of July, you have plenty of time to whip up one (or several) of these flag shutters.

DSCF8146-001Hanging Shutter Wall Display
I’ve made different versions of these in the past, but I think this one is the quickest and easiest to achieve.

DSCF8178-001Shutter Shelf
If you want to be even more frugal with this shelf, repurpose shelf brackets from old shelves.

DSCF8184-001Enjoy!

Cutter Quilt Knapsack

knapsack 7Cutter Quilt Knapsack

I made this project last year, but I never posted it on my blog. I had cut pieces to make a few more, but didn’t get around to finishing them. Since the weather has turned frigid again, it’s the perfect time to pull them out and complete them. That’s what I’m working on today.

Stitch up a shabby chic knapsack using an old worn quilt that is no longer useable as it was originally intended. This quick-to-sew project is designed with exposed seams, giving it a charming scrappy appearance. If you would like to give this project a shot, here is my tutorial.

Things You Will Need:

Old worn quilt
1/8 yard muslin
Measuring tape
Scissors
Sewing machine
Straight pins
40-inch cord of your choice
Bodkin or large safety pin
Button, velcro or snap

2-DSCF1107Cut knapsack pieces from an old cutter quilt:

Body-(2) 15-inch-tall by 17-inch-wide
Pocket and Flap-(1 each) 7-inch-square
Handle Loop-(1) 2-inch-wide by 8-inch-long
Straps-(2) 2-inch-wide by 36-inch-long

From muslin, cut one 4-inch-wide by 32-inch long strip for the drawstring casing.

Top stitch around all the cutter quilt pieces 1/4 inch from the edges. This will secure the layers of the quilt together.

knapsack 1Lay one body rectangle on your work surface with the right side facing up and the long edges running horizontal. This rectangle will be the front of the knapsack. The long edges are the top and bottom edges of your knapsack. Place the pocket square on the rectangle with the right side facing up. Position the bottom edge of the pocket 2 1/2 inches above the bottom edge of the rectangle. Center the sides of the pocket between the sides of the rectangle. Top stitch the sides and bottom of the pocket, 1/4 inch from the edge, connecting it to the rectangle. Note: The edges will be exposed throughout the project unless otherwise instructed.

Place the two body rectangles together with the right sides facing out. Align the edges. Cut a 3-inch square from both bottom corners, through all thicknesses. Pin the side and bottom edges. Do not pin the cut out square corners. Sew the pinned edges using a 1/4-inch seam allowance.

knapsack 2Open a corner and diagonally squeeze the opening. Match the side seam with the bottom seam, with the right sides facing out. Pin the edges together. Sew the pinned edge using a 1/4-inch seam allowance. This creates a boxed corner. Repeat on the remaining bottom corner of the knapsack.

knapsack 3Lay the knapsack body on your work surface with the back facing up. Measure in 3/4 inch from one bottom corner. Place one end of a strap on the bottom seam at this measurement. Pin to hold. Pin an end of the remaining strap 3/4 inch in from the other bottom corner. Sew over the pinned ends using a 1/4-inch seam allowance.

knapsack 4Lay the knapsack body on your work surface with the back facing up once again. Find the center of the top edge. Stack the unsecured ends of the straps together and pin to the top edge of the body back. Pin an end of the handle loop on each side of the stacked straps. Center one edge of the flap square over the pinned loop and straps with the flap facing wrong side up. Fold the muslin casing strip in half with the long edges matching. Find the center of the casing length and pin the raw edges to the top edge of the knapsack’s back through all thicknesses. Continue to pin the raw edges of the casing around the top edge of the knapsack. You will have a gap between the ends of the casing on the front of the knapsack. Sew the pinned edge using a 1/4-inch seam allowance. Yes, all the layers make the back section quite thick, but it can be sewn through. A heavyduty (jean) needle is recommended.

knapsack 5Attach a bodkin or large safety pin to one end of a 40-inch length of cording. Thread the cording through the casing. Adjust the cording with an equal amount exposed from each opening of the casing. This is the drawstring closure for the knapsack.

knapsack 6Flip the flap over the top and to the front of the knapsack. Attach a button, velcro or snap to the front and flap of the knapsack to close.

knapsack 7(sigh) I love my machine and I used to love the buttonhole foot, but the finished one in the photo has a button/buttonhole closure. My sewing machine seems to have issues lately with making buttonholes, so the ones I am finishing today will have velcro closures with buttons for decoration. Since I’m sure Brother reads each and every one of my blogs with immense interest, Brother Sewing Machine company, I would be happy to test out new models. 😉 LOL! Just saying…

Enjoy!

Primitive Pumpkin Shutter

5-DSCN2316-001Primitive Pumpkin Shutter

I love turning things that end up on the curb into fun and whimsical seasonal decorations. Paint an old window shutter into a primitive pumpkin shutter for fall and Halloween decor. Not a painter? No problem. This is a primitive project, and crisp straight lines are not required. Except for the drying time of the paint, this shutter can be completed very quickly.

Things You Will Need:

Old window shutter
Tools for removing hardware
Orange acrylic paint
Paper plate
Sea sponge
Black acrylic paint
Stencil brush
Kitchen sponges
Permanent marker
Ruler
Scissors
Yellow-gold acrylic paint
Artist’s paintbrush
Green acrylic paint

1-DSCN2274-001Remove any hinges, knobs and hooks from your shutter and clean well.

Pour orange acrylic paint onto a paper plate. Wet a sea sponge and wring it out well. Dip the sponge in the paint and sponge it over the front, back and side surfaces of the shutter. Do not worry about complete coverage. This project allows for the original surface to peek through. Allow the paint to dry.

2-DSCN2286-001Many window shutters have a spine on the front that opens and closes the slats. For this project, this side will be the back. You want the flattest side to paint your pumpkin on. Lay the shutter with the flat side facing up. This is now the front. Pour black paint onto a paper plate. Dip the sea sponge in the paint and dab it on the front and sides of the shutter. The back will remain orange. Allow the paint to dry.

4-DSCN2301-001Using a large stencil brush, pounce orange paint in a long oval that covers most of the front surface on the shutter. This is your pumpkin shape. Allow the paint to dry.

3-DSCN2294-001Trace a 3-inch-tall triangle with a 2-inch base on a kitchen sponge using a permanent marking pen. Cut out the shape using scissors. Raggedy edges are fine. Draw a 1 1/2-inch-wide by 4 1/4-inch long rectangle on another kitchen sponge. Round the corners of the rectangle. Cut out the rectangle.

Dip the triangle into black acrylic paint. Stamp the triangle in the center of the pumpkin shape. This is the nose. Using the triangle and black paint, apply the eyes above the nose as desired. Dip the rectangle sponge into yellow-gold acrylic paint and stamp a mouth below the nose. Allow the paint to dry.

Dip an artist’s paintbrush into black acrylic paint. Paint a thin line around the mouth. This is supposed to look primitive, so perfect lines are not necessary. Paint a thin line across the center of the mouth. Paint vertical lines across the center line to create the teeth. Allow the paint to dry.

Using green acrylic paint, paint a stem at the top of the pumpkin.

5-DSCN2316-001My shutter was 6 1/2 inches wide by 20 inches long. This primitive project allows for altering and adjusting the steps to fit on any size shutter.

The finished shutter will lean against a wall or furniture, as it will not lay flat because of the spine on the back.

Enjoy!

Pumpkin Lids

3-DSCF1995Pumpkin Lids

1-DSCF1909It’s that time of year again when the potential for pumpkins seems to be everywhere. I found these old pot lids in my stash of junk.

2-DSCF1992Painted orange, they immediately started their transformation to fall decor.

5-DSCF1998A primitive face gave them their personality…

4-DSCF1997…then I added a few bottle caps spelling out the word “PUMPKIN” to finish.

3-DSCF1995What do you think?

Enjoy!

Places I’m partying this week:

Monday:

Inspiration Monday
Make It Pretty Monday
Block Party
Craftastic Monday
Monday Funday

Tuesday:

Trash 2 Treasure Tuesday
The Inspiration Board
From Dream To Reality
The Scoop

Wednesday:

Wow Us Wednesdays
Wednesday’s Adorned From Above
{wow me} wednesday
A Little Bird Told Me
Wednesday Whatsits
Whatever Goes Wednesday
Time For A Party

Thursday:

Catch a Glimpse Thursday
The Project Stash Link Party
Under $100 Link Party
Creative Inspirations Linky Party
Lovely Ladies Linky
Celebrate It! Blog Party
Create It Thursday

Friday:

Feathered Nest Friday
Frugal Friday
Creativity Unleashed
Show and Tell Friday
I’m Lovin’ It
Simple and Sweet Fridays

Saturday:

Show and Tell Saturday
Get Schooled Saturday
Party Junk
Show-Licious Craft & Recipe Party

Sunday:

Think Pink Sunday
Submarine Sunday
That DIY Party
Nifty Thrifty Sunday
Sew Darn Crafty
Bouquet of Talent

Primitive Halloween Witch Wands

Primitive Halloween Witch WandsPrimitive Halloween Witch Wands

10-DSCF1864I collect a lot of junk that I think I will eventually use for new projects, but until I sorted, organized and packed for our move I never really realized how much of any one thing I had hoarded collected. Spindles and dowels are just one of the collections I am referring to.

08-DSCF1858Even though I have made things with them before, I have never gathered enough of them together to make several of anything. Well, knowing just how many of them I have has changed that. Since I don’t want to purge them, creating with them is the next best option. My prim witch wands were born.

04-DSCF1794I used chair spindles of similar size and shape for the wands. I didn’t get a before pic, but they were all gray and weathered. I cleaned them up and gave them a coat of white paint. I was leaning toward a primitive design from the start so dry brushing the white paint was quick and made me happy.

06-DSCF1811Continuing along the same quick and dirty path, I free-handed black and orange stripes around the spindles.

05-DSCF1800A simple cat head topped the wands. I love the way they turned out. I hope you do too.

Enjoy!