Scrappy Quilt Bracelets

21-DSCF2694Scrappy Quilt Bracelets

16-DSCN4483You may remember my scrappy fabric tags I made a couple of years ago. I loved that idea.

02-DSCF2577I have been working on expanding on that idea by turning scrap cutter quilts into wearable art…more specifically I wanted to see if I couldn’t turn these scraps into bracelets.

I’m a little embarrassed to say that each step took a little bit of refining until I was able to get a consistent result with each one that I tried. I almost threw in the towel a few times, but the time wasted and each failed attempt just made me even more determined to make it work.

My first fail was cutting the strip for the bracelet. I didn’t take into account the quilting stitches on the quilt. Quilting stitches hold a top, middle and bottom layer together. When I cut a small strip, it basically peeled apart in large areas. Stitching on vintage quilts is also unreliable. There were areas where the seams came apart. AARGH!

01-DSCF2580My fix for those problems was to top stitch over the surface of a scrap of quilt. I emptied a spool of thread while meandering in a scribble design.

03-DSCF2586I was then able to cut my bracelet strips without them falling apart.

04-DSCF2601The next step was getting the words onto the strip. I decided to use my character stitches on my sewing machine. That worked the first couple of times and then…AARGH! Old quilts can be kinda lumpy and my machine didn’t want to stitch the tiny letters over the lumps. I finally tried stitching the words on muslin. Eureka!06-DSCF2608

I then stitched the the muslin to the strip in my favorite shabby way.

15-DSCF2673If you want to try this and you don’t have character stitches on your machine I also tried it with stamps as an alternative.

07-DSCF2616I embellished around the words with little pearl beads.

The next failure was the buttonhole. Yep, for the same reason the character stitches didn’t want to stitch…those !@#$% lumps. AARGH!

Deep breath. I was not going to let this project beat me!

17-DSCF2682Light bulb! I finally had good luck with a button/loop closure. Elastic cord formed the loop.

09-DSCF2625With the bracelet strip placed on canvas fabric and the knot of the loop inserted under one end, I stitched around the edges of the bracelet a couple of times. Just like the shabby tags, I didn’t stitch perfect lines.

13-DSCF2637After stitching the canvas backing to the bracelet I trimmed the excess away and added a button to complete the closure function.

14-DSCF2686And then like eating potato chips, I couldn’t stop at just one.

Enjoy!

Junkcycled Charm Bracelets

New in my Etsy shop, junkcycled charm bracelets.

02-DSCF2482Junkcycled Pink and White Charm Bracelet

05-DSCF2468Junkcycled Blue and Ivory Charm Bracelet  

08-DSCF2474Junkcycled Green and Ivory Charm Bracelet

11-DSCF2469Junkcycled Purple and Silver Charm Bracelet

15-DSCF2478Junkcycled Cream and Silver Charm Bracelet

Enjoy!

Poker Table Redo

14-Poker Table 704x960-012Poker Table Redo

A project from my youngest apple that didn’t fall far from the tree. This proud “tree” has now officially instilled the merits of turning junk into gems to all her “apples”.

01-Poker Table 704x960While my youngest (Colby) was home from school for Christmas break he snagged this old poker table that a friend was going to toss out. He just knew it would be a treasure.

04-Poker Table 704x960-003It turned out that taking the thing apart was a project all on its own.

05-Poker Table 704x960-004The whole family got involved with the transformation, but Colby did the bulk of the work.

09-Poker Table 704x960-008The legs were attached to the board and the rim slid over the edges of the board. Everything was attached with rivets.

11-Poker Table 704x960-010There was no salvaging the board so a new piece of plywood was purchased and cut…

…and reattached to the legs.

07-Poker Table 704x960-006New plastic feet were also added to the legs.

08-Poker Table 704x960-007The new board was slightly thinner than the original because green felt was going to be used instead of paint.

12-Poker Table 720x960The edge of the board and the felt had to slide into the rim of the table. We sprayed the board with adhesive and smoothed the felt over it.

13-Poker Table 704x960-011Reattaching the rim was challenging. Even though we purchased a thinner board, the fit was still very tight. After struggling for a bit, we finally decided to widen the groove in the metal rim by bending it with pliers. Whew! Much better!

14-Poker Table 704x960-012Enjoy!

Molly the Mannequin Makeover

Molly the Mannequin (3)Molly the Mannequin Makeover

What inspires your project choices?

My recent move, the frigid change in the weather, an empty Etsy store and Molly the Mannequin hanging in my closet were my inspiration for this makeover. The recent move reminded me of all the goodies I have in my supplies, like my collection of beads and old jewelry. The frigid weather had me looking for nice cozy projects to do in the house. Restyling that old jewelry seemed perfect. Since I wanted to place the finished creations in my Etsy store, getting Molly the Mannequin more presentable for photos was a priority.

1-DSCF2396I’ve never been fond of Molly’s looks. She, uhm…, always seemed a bit nekked.

I decided decoupaging her with old book pages would give her a more modest appearance while creating an artful background for my style of crafting.

2-DSCF2402An old poetry book and Mod Podge were the basic supplies needed to transform Molly.

Molly the MannequinI molded the wet pages around Molly’s curves with my fingers, not minding the wrinkles at all. I just thought they added to the Old World-antique look.

Molly the Mannequin (2)I love the way she turned out. I have a hand and head that I plan on giving the same treatment.

Enjoy!

Snowman Hurricane Shade

3-DSCN3068-001A last-minute quickie for the holidays.

Add a warm, whimsical glow to your dining table with a snowman hurricane shade.

1-DSCN3058-001This snowman started out as a clear glass hurricane shade I picked up at a yard sale. The shade was classic for everyday use, but I wanted something a little more festive for the holidays. I chose to use acrylic enamel as the base for the snowman to ensure the paint would be durable and less likely to scratch or flake from handling. This is a quick project that can be completed in about an hour, including drying time.

Things You Will Need:

Clear glass hurricane shade
Window cleaner
Paper towel
Sea sponge
White acrylic enamel paint
Paper plate
Paintbrush
Powder blush
Bath towel
Orange acrylic paint
New pencil
Black acrylic paint
Black paint pen
Christmas fabric
Scissors
Measuring tape

Thoroughly clean the outside of the shade using window cleaner and a paper towel.

2-DSCN3063-001Wet a sea sponge and wring it out so that it’s damp, but not dripping. Pour white acrylic enamel paint onto a paper plate. Place the hurricane shade over your arm. With the other hand, dip the sponge into the paint and dab it on the glass. Repeat until the entire outer surface of the shade has been painted. Carefully stand the shade on your work surface to dry.

Using a paintbrush and powder blush, paint two large cheeks on the center-front of the shade.

Lay the shade on a bath towel to prevent the shade from rolling. Dip a paintbrush in orange acrylic paint. Pointing it to one side, paint a 2-inch triangle with a 3/4-inch base between the cheeks for the carrot nose.

Dip the eraser end of a new pencil in black acrylic paint. Dot two eyes spaced 1/4 inch apart and 1/2 inch above the nose.

Draw a smile using a black paint pen. Allow the face paint to dry.

Rip a 2-inch wide by 36-inch long strip from Christmas fabric. Stand the shade right side up on your work surface. Wrap the fabric strip around the bottom of the shade. Bring the ends together and tie into a bow on the front of the snowman. Trim the ends of the strip as desired.

3-DSCN3068-001Light a tea candle in a glass votive holder. Place the snowman hurricane shade over the candle. The candlelight will shine through the snowman head.

For a snowman hurricane shade that can be displayed throughout the winter months, substitute a winter novelty fabric for the Christmas fabric.

Enjoy!