Snowman Lights

6-DSCF2320Snowman Lights

Big news for our family! We are moving again. Yep, if you have been a follower for at least a year, you know we sold our home and moved the first part of February. At that time we were limited to rentals that were available. In a small town it wasn’t encouraging. We were thankful we found something, but we had to settle for something way too small for our family. A couple of months ago the landlord told us of his intentions to put the rental up for sale. We didn’t want to be caught with no where to go when our lease was up at the end of January so we started looking again. AND we found it! Much bigger. More our style (cute, late 1800s home). Slightly (just slightly) higher rent. We had to go for it or it would be gone. Sooo….we’re moving…now…and during the next couple of weeks. Send us good juju. Hey, at least it’s not snowing like last year…at least not this week. :)

I have several projects I intend to post, but time and internet connections may screw that up a bit. I’ll keep plodding away whenever I can. Meanwhile…

2-DSCF2287…these lights were a terrific thrifting find this summer. There are seven of them. I love the silicone bulbs.

In keeping with my last-minute-clean-the-drawers-out-before-the-last-craft-show-of-the-season kinda crafting, I decided snowman lights were the perfect use for these adorable lights.

These lights are very similar to my orange chenille pumpkin lights I made a couple of years ago.

1-DSCF2284I shrunk the size slightly and used the scraps from some of my old cutter quilts instead of chenille. The backs of the quilts are the outside of the snowmen.

I didn’t have kitty litter on hand to weight the bottoms down, so I improvised and used a couple of handfuls of glass floral marbles. I had plenty, as those things seem to breed in my closets. ;)

4-DSCF2314The lights were inserted in the same way as the pumpkin lights.

3-DSCF2290Simple primitive snowman faces gave these frosty fellows their character.

7-DSCF2321A strip of black fabric finished off the look.

5-DSCF2317Enjoy!

Spider Web Mug Rug Tutorial

5-DSCN2239Spider Web Mug Rug Tutorial

As the weather gets chillier, the cocoa starts coming out of the cupboard. In keeping with the season, make a spider web mug rug to add to the seasonal atmosphere. Make a set for your home, or give them as gifts to family and friends. From beginning to end, this mug rug took approximately 20 minutes to complete. If you are making several, cut out the pieces and construct in an assembly line fashion for faster completion. I used a solid black fabric for this project so that the lines of the spider web would pop. You could also use other fabric and thread colors for added whimsy.

Things You Will Need:

Card stock
Compass
Scissors
Black fabric
Ruler
Quilt batting
Straight pins
Tailor’s chalk
Sewing machine
Black thread
Iron
White thread

Step 1
Trace a 5-inch circle on card stock using a compass. Cut out the circle.

Step 2
Measure and cut two 6-inch squares from black fabric and one 6-inch square from quilt batting. Lay the quilt batting square on your work surface. Place the black fabric squares together with the right sides facing. Stack the fabric squares on the batting square. Pin through all layers to secure.

1-DSCN2227Step 3
Center the card stock circle on the top black square. Trace around the circle using tailor’s chalk.

2-DSCN2229Step 4
Sew the circle, stitching on the chalk line. Leave a 2 inch opening for turning. Cut out the circle approximately 1/8 inch outside the stitch line. At the opening of the circle cut at least a 1/2 inch from the chalk line. Turn the circle right side out and press. Hand sew the opening closed.

3-DSCN2232Step 5
Mark a dot in the center of the coaster using tailor’s chalk.

4-DSCN2233Starting on one edge of the coaster, top stitch across the center to the opposite edge using the white thread. This is across the diameter of the circle. Continue to top stitch across the coaster until you have a total of eight equal pie sections.

5-DSCN2239Step 6
The lines from the center of the circle to the outer edge are the radius lines. Connect the radius lines across the pie sections. Start at the center of one radius line on a pie section. You do not need to measure this, eyeballing is sufficient. Stitch straight across the pie section to the next radius line. Continue stitching across the center of each pie section until you reach the beginning line once again. For the sake of clarity, I’ll call the lines just made “horizontal” lines.

Step 7
Repeat step 6 half way between the horizontal lines and the center of the circle. Repeat one last time between the first horizontal lines and the outer edge of the circle.

If you don’t have a compass, there are other options for making a circle pattern. I used my Cricut Expression to cut out my circle. Measuring objects around the house may also yield a circle shape of the right diameter.

Enjoy!

Fall Leaf Bowl Fillers

Fall Leaf Bowl FillersAre you looking for natural fall decorations, but you’re not too excited about bringing bugs and dirt into your house? These fall leaf bowl fillers may be just the craft project for you. Yes, it does involve bringing in a couple of leaves to use as a pattern, but once your pattern is made, they can go back outside where they belong.

1-y212First off, head outside and find a leaf that has a good size and shape. Trace the leaf on the paper side of freezer paper.

2-y214Lay the traced freezer paper on the right side of your chosen fabric. Iron the fabric. This will temporarily adhere the freezer paper to the fabric.

I used upholstery samples that had been discontinued at a home improvement store, and some scrap pieces I had leftover from previous upholstery jobs. This project can really be made with any fabric, so there is no need to limit yourself to the fabric I used.

3-y213Sketch the veins of the leaf onto the traced paper leaf. Using a zig-zag stitch, sew over the sketched lines. Cut the fabric around the traced leaf shape. Peel the paper off the fabric.

Tip: Smaller (tighter) zig-zag stitches will make the needle-perforated paper easier to remove.

Lay a matching fabric scrap on your work surface with the wrong side facing up. Place the cut fabric leaf on the fabric with the right side facing up. Pin the pieces together. Sew the top leaf to the fabric 1/4 inch from the edge using a straight stitch. Leave a 2-inch opening on one edge.

4-y215Cut the excess fabric from the back using the front leaf as a guide. Stuff the leaf and continue to sew closed.

Fall Leaf Bowl FillersEnjoy!

Fall Burlap Bag-Tutorial

Fall Burlap Bag-TutorialFall Burlap Bag

Sew a fall burlap bag to hang on your wall filled with a display of fall foliage. With appliqued fall leaves and a bit of trim, this bag can be displayed throughout the cool autumn months. Make them for yourself, to sell, or give as gifts to neighbors and friends.

Things You Will Need:

Silk fall leaves
Lightweight fusible web
Parchment paper
Iron
Scissors
Burlap
Measuring tape
Sewing machine
Straight pins
Scrap of lace trim
Twine

Peel the plastic stems and veins from two silk fall leaves. You do not want anything on the leaves.

1-y419Lay a piece of lightweight fusible web with the glue side up on your ironing surface. Place the leaves with their front sides facing up on the web. Lay a sheet of parchment paper over the leaves and the web. Iron over the parchment paper to fuse the leaves to the fusible web. The parchment paper will protect your iron from the glue on the web, and it will not stick to the glue.

Remove the parchment paper. Cut the fusible web around the leaves.

2-y420Cut two 8-inch-wide by 10-inch-long rectangles from burlap. Lay one rectangle on your work surface. Turn so the rectangle is running lengthwise. This will be the front of your bag. Peel the paper from the back of the leaves. Center and arrange the leaves on the rectangle. Iron the leaves to fuse them to the burlap. Sew a zigzag or decorative stitch around the edges of the leaves to secure.

3-y421Lay the remaining rectangle on your work surface. Place the bag front on the rectangle with the leaf side facing down. Pin the long edges and the short bottom edge of the bag together. Sew the pinned edges using a 1/4-inch seam allowance.

4-y422Turn the open edge of the bag 1/2 inch to the wrong side, press and pin. Sew the pinned edge to hem the top opening of the bag. Turn the bag right side out and press.

Cut a 7 1/2-inch length of scrap trim or lace. For a more primitive touch, I used recycled trim from an old pillowcase. I liked the aged color and imperfections.

Lay the bag with the front side facing up. Place the trim along the bottom edge, overlapping 1/4 inch on the bottom of the bag. Pin the the trim to the bag. Top stitch along the pinned edge to attach the trim.

Fall Burlap Bag-TutorialCut a 18-inch length of twine. Tie a knot on each end. Place one end inside the bag at one seam. Pin the knot 1 inch below the top edge of the bag. Sew across the twine, just above the knot. Pin and sew the other end of the twine to the remaining seam on the bag.

Insert silk leaves, dried flowers or other fall floral decorations in the bag. Hand the bag on your wall, a door knob or peg hook.

Wanda Witch

07-DSCF1944Another gem I found during our recent move.

Years ago I made these witches with my neighbor when I lived in Denver. After I moved to Kansas I misplaced the pattern. My Denver neighbor sent me a copy of her pattern and I started to make them again. Before I could finish them, life happened and they were put away again. I had completely forgotten about them until I made this move and found the parts again.

10-DSCF1957The pattern I used was from the October 1993 Crafts N’ Things magazine.

The bodies, legs and arms were all stitched and stuffed, but they were still just parts. I finished attaching everything and added the faces. The pattern used appliques for the eyes and mouth. I painted mine instead. Probably a good thing as I don’t think they can be purchased anymore.

01-DSCF1914They look a bit like aliens in this photo. :)

02-DSCF1919The clothes pieces were also cut and ready to go. Woo Hoo! That’s half the battle with sewing projects. All I had to do was stitch them together.

03-DSCF1924I made primitive buttons using Sculpey clay.

09-DSCF1952They were nice finishing touches for the dress…

08-DSCF1949…and the shoes.

06-DSCF1942The pattern called for excelsior hair, which I had used with the witches I made previously, but I just wasn’t feeling it this time. I used a mixture of gray, black and white curly doll hair. I also added a roll of black tulle to the brim of the hat.

05-DSCF1939Enjoy!