Fall Burlap Bag-Tutorial

Fall Burlap Bag-TutorialFall Burlap Bag

Sew a fall burlap bag to hang on your wall filled with a display of fall foliage. With appliqued fall leaves and a bit of trim, this bag can be displayed throughout the cool autumn months. Make them for yourself, to sell, or give as gifts to neighbors and friends.

Things You Will Need:

Silk fall leaves
Lightweight fusible web
Parchment paper
Iron
Scissors
Burlap
Measuring tape
Sewing machine
Straight pins
Scrap of lace trim
Twine

Peel the plastic stems and veins from two silk fall leaves. You do not want anything on the leaves.

1-y419Lay a piece of lightweight fusible web with the glue side up on your ironing surface. Place the leaves with their front sides facing up on the web. Lay a sheet of parchment paper over the leaves and the web. Iron over the parchment paper to fuse the leaves to the fusible web. The parchment paper will protect your iron from the glue on the web, and it will not stick to the glue.

Remove the parchment paper. Cut the fusible web around the leaves.

2-y420Cut two 8-inch-wide by 10-inch-long rectangles from burlap. Lay one rectangle on your work surface. Turn so the rectangle is running lengthwise. This will be the front of your bag. Peel the paper from the back of the leaves. Center and arrange the leaves on the rectangle. Iron the leaves to fuse them to the burlap. Sew a zigzag or decorative stitch around the edges of the leaves to secure.

3-y421Lay the remaining rectangle on your work surface. Place the bag front on the rectangle with the leaf side facing down. Pin the long edges and the short bottom edge of the bag together. Sew the pinned edges using a 1/4-inch seam allowance.

4-y422Turn the open edge of the bag 1/2 inch to the wrong side, press and pin. Sew the pinned edge to hem the top opening of the bag. Turn the bag right side out and press.

Cut a 7 1/2-inch length of scrap trim or lace. For a more primitive touch, I used recycled trim from an old pillowcase. I liked the aged color and imperfections.

Lay the bag with the front side facing up. Place the trim along the bottom edge, overlapping 1/4 inch on the bottom of the bag. Pin the the trim to the bag. Top stitch along the pinned edge to attach the trim.

Fall Burlap Bag-TutorialCut a 18-inch length of twine. Tie a knot on each end. Place one end inside the bag at one seam. Pin the knot 1 inch below the top edge of the bag. Sew across the twine, just above the knot. Pin and sew the other end of the twine to the remaining seam on the bag.

Insert silk leaves, dried flowers or other fall floral decorations in the bag. Hand the bag on your wall, a door knob or peg hook.

Wanda Witch

07-DSCF1944Another gem I found during our recent move.

Years ago I made these witches with my neighbor when I lived in Denver. After I moved to Kansas I misplaced the pattern. My Denver neighbor sent me a copy of her pattern and I started to make them again. Before I could finish them, life happened and they were put away again. I had completely forgotten about them until I made this move and found the parts again.

10-DSCF1957The pattern I used was from the October 1993 Crafts N’ Things magazine.

The bodies, legs and arms were all stitched and stuffed, but they were still just parts. I finished attaching everything and added the faces. The pattern used appliques for the eyes and mouth. I painted mine instead. Probably a good thing as I don’t think they can be purchased anymore.

01-DSCF1914They look a bit like aliens in this photo. :)

02-DSCF1919The clothes pieces were also cut and ready to go. Woo Hoo! That’s half the battle with sewing projects. All I had to do was stitch them together.

03-DSCF1924I made primitive buttons using Sculpey clay.

09-DSCF1952They were nice finishing touches for the dress…

08-DSCF1949…and the shoes.

06-DSCF1942The pattern called for excelsior hair, which I had used with the witches I made previously, but I just wasn’t feeling it this time. I used a mixture of gray, black and white curly doll hair. I also added a roll of black tulle to the brim of the hat.

05-DSCF1939Enjoy!

Sew Fabric Tube Pumpkins for Fall-Tutorial

2-Fabric Tube PumpkinsAre you ready for a craft show best-seller? These pumpkins practically flew out of my last craft show booth. Even if craft shows aren’t your thing, several of these fabric tube pumpkins will add that touch of fall to your home that you have been wanting. One pumpkin is quick to make, but if you make several using an assembly line technique for the steps, you can finish them in an afternoon.

Things You Will Need:

Fabric
Measuring tape
Scissors
Straight pins
Sewing machine
Embroidery needle
Crochet thread
Stuffing
Long soft-sculpture needle
Stick
Jig saw (optional)
Silk fall leaves
Hot glue gun

Cut a 15-inch-wide by 25-inch-long rectangle from fabric of your choice. I have used fabric of any color, design, texture and weight that I thought would make a cute pumpkin.

Fold the rectangle in half with the short ends together and the right sides facing. Pin the short ends together. Sew the pinned edge using a 1/2-inch seam allowance. You now have a tube. Do not turn right side out.

y772Thread an embroidery needle with a neutral crochet thread that coordinates with the pumpkin’s fabric. Sew a running stitch around one open end of the tube, 1/2 inch from the end. Cinch the opening closed. Hold the end while wrapping the remaining thread around the gathers (1/2 inch from the end) five times. Knot the end and cut the thread. Tip: Some fabrics may have fibers with a loose or open weave. To prevent the thread of the running stitch from pulling out of the fabric when gathered, knot the thread on the needle in two strands. When you have stitched the running stitches around the opening, insert the needle between the strands, just above the knot. Cinch the fabric and continue with wrapping the thread.

y773Turn the pumpkin right side out. Fill the pumpkin with stuffing. Sew a running stitch around the opening. Cinch to gather the opening closed. Knot and cut the thread.

y774Thread 3 yards of the crochet thread on a long soft-sculpture needle. Yes, that seems like a lot, but you don’t want to stop part way through making the pumpkin spines. Knot one end of the thread.

y775Insert the needle through the center of the gathers on the bottom of the pumpkin. Don’t worry, the knot will not show when finished. Pull the needle and the length of the thread out the top of the pumpkin. Pull the thread over the side of the pumpkin and reinsert the needle through the gathers on the bottom and back out the top. Cinch to squish the pumpkin and create a spine in the side of the pumpkin. Repeat, evenly spacing six spines around the pumpkin sides. Bring the needle out the top. Knot and cut the thread.

y771Gather a stick from your yard with a diameter approximately the size of your fingers. Break the stick to a length of approximately 4 inches long, or use a jig saw to cut the stick. Apply hot glue to the center top of the pumpkin. Stand the stick in the glue and press down. Hold until the glue has cooled.

Peel four fall leaves from a silk leaf floral stem. Apply hot glue to the back of the leaves and arrange them around the stem of the pumpkin.

3-DSCN7369If desired, finish the pumpkin with a few strands of raffia tied around the stem.

DSCN2865Enjoy!

Places I’m partying this week:

Monday:

Inspiration Monday
Make It Pretty Monday
Block Party
Craftastic Monday
Monday Funday
Creative Corner Hop

Tuesday:

Trash 2 Treasure Tuesday
The Inspiration Board
From Dream To Reality
The Scoop

Wednesday:

Wow Us Wednesdays
Wednesday’s Adorned From Above
{wow me} wednesday
A Little Bird Told Me
Wednesday Whatsits
Whatever Goes Wednesday
Time For A Party

Thursday:

Catch a Glimpse Thursday
The Project Stash Link Party
Under $100 Link Party
Creative Inspirations Linky Party
Lovely Ladies Linky
Create It Thursday

Friday:

Feathered Nest Friday
Frugal Friday
Creativity Unleashed
Show and Tell Friday
I’m Lovin’ It
Simple and Sweet Fridays

Saturday:

Show and Tell Saturday
Get Schooled Saturday
Party Junk
Show-Licious Craft & Recipe Party

Sunday:

Think Pink Sunday
Submarine Sunday
That DIY Party
Nifty Thrifty Sunday
Sew Darn Crafty
Bouquet of Talent

 

Chenille Bedspread Candy Cane Bowl Filler-Tutorial

y871I have posted about this project before, but I have never posted the entire tutorial on my blog. Since this is such a good seller at my craft shows, I thought it was time to share the specifics. :)

Vintage linens offer an unexpected fabric for new sewing projects. I especially love chenille bedspreads. I use them quite a bit in my craft designs, but I am often left with small scraps that I just can’t bring myself to toss. This primitive candy cane bowl filler is the perfect solution for putting those scraps to good use. Made with primitively appliqued stripes and exposed seams, this bowl filler works up very quickly.

Things You Will Need:

Card stock
Marking pen
Ruler
Scissors
White chenille bedspread
Red fabric
Straight pins
Sewing machine
Stuffing

y872Trace a candy cane shape on card stock that is approximately 1 1/2 inches wide by 7 inches tall. This measurement does not need to be exact. You can draw your shape free hand or enlarge a “J” from a favorite font on your computer and print it out. Cut out the shape. This is your pattern.

Lay a white chenille bedspread on your work surface with the wrong side facing up. Place the candy cane pattern on the chenille and lightly trace around it with a marking pen. This is the the back of the fabric, but the cane is sewn with edges exposed, so you will want to cut away the pen marks. Cut out the shape just inside the marked lines.

Cut six 1-inch-wide by 2 1/2-inch-long strips of red fabric.

y873Place the chenille candy cane on your work surface with the right side facing up. Place the red fabric strips across the width of the cane and spaced evenly from one end of the cane to the other. Pin the strips in place.

1-DSCF1869Top stitch the edges of the red strips across the width of the cane, as close to the edges as possible. Trim the ends of the strips even with the cane. This is the front of your candy cane bowl filler.

2-DSCF1875Lay your white chenille bedspread on your work surface with the wrong side up. Place the candy cane front on the chenille with the red stripes facing up. Pin the candy cane to the chenille.

3-DSCF1882Sew around the edges of the cane using a 1/4-inch seam allowance. Do not sew the bottom end of the cane.

Cut out the shape using the front candy cane as your guide. Do not turn the cane. The side on the outside is the right side. Stuff the candy cane. Sew the end closed in the same way as the other edges of the candy cane.

y871Rip a 1-inch wide by 20-inch long strip of red fabric. Wrap the strip around the candy cane and tie into a bow. Trim the ends.

For a variety of candy cane flavors, choose other colors to create the stripes.

Enjoy!

 

Primitive Halloween Witch Wands

Primitive Halloween Witch WandsPrimitive Halloween Witch Wands

10-DSCF1864I collect a lot of junk that I think I will eventually use for new projects, but until I sorted, organized and packed for our move I never really realized how much of any one thing I had hoarded collected. Spindles and dowels are just one of the collections I am referring to.

08-DSCF1858Even though I have made things with them before, I have never gathered enough of them together to make several of anything. Well, knowing just how many of them I have has changed that. Since I don’t want to purge them, creating with them is the next best option. My prim witch wands were born.

04-DSCF1794I used chair spindles of similar size and shape for the wands. I didn’t get a before pic, but they were all gray and weathered. I cleaned them up and gave them a coat of white paint. I was leaning toward a primitive design from the start so dry brushing the white paint was quick and made me happy.

06-DSCF1811Continuing along the same quick and dirty path, I free-handed black and orange stripes around the spindles.

05-DSCF1800A simple cat head topped the wands. I love the way they turned out. I hope you do too.

Enjoy!