Wood Pile To Garden

7-DSCF4090Rain, rain, go away!

This process is taking much longer than we anticipated, in large part because it won’t stop raining.

3-DSCF4053This is where we finally moved my wood pile. When we moved into this house in Nov./Dec., we were trying to beat the bad weather and the wood was piled next to the driveway. The plan was to move it to a spot beside the house and put in a garden where the wood had been.

It has taken forever!

2-DSCF4052I didn’t get a before pic of the old wood pile, but after getting it all moved and the grass trimmed, this is what our new garden area looked like.

5-DSCF4060We decided on a raised-bed garden. The frame actually went together pretty quickly.

6-DSCF4088We then lined it with landscape fabric and had a load of dirt delivered.

And then the rains came again. I really wanted to finish this post with wonderful plants planted nicely, but we have been waiting for the mud to dry out enough to work in. Who knows how long that will take. Like a good portion of the Midwest, we have had rain, are having rain, or expecting lots more rain.

sigh…well, eventually…

4-DSCF4055At least the wood pile looks good!

Enjoy!

Footstool/Child’s Chair

3-DSCF4032Footstool/Child’s Chair

1-DSCF4012I’ve had this little stool for quite a while, but I haven’t really used it since our first move. This finish just didn’t seem to fit with my decor. In my house if it sticks around long enough it will probably be repainted.

I started out with a couple coats of white paint, thinking I would probably distress it with sanding. Since I have a couple of other projects planned with the same distressing technique and color, I decided to give this stool a crackle finish instead.

4-DSCF4034I no longer purchase expensive crackle mediums for this technique. Cheap white glue is my medium of choice. It is thickly applied over the base color and the top color is painted over the glue while it is still wet. A hair dryer is then used to quickly crackle and dry the layers. FYI, the thicker the glue the bigger the cracks.

5-DSCF4036When crackling, I do one surface at a time, always with that surface flat and facing up. This prevents the wet layers from sliding and sagging. Let’s face it, nobody likes saggy cracks.

2-DSCF4028Glue crackling takes a little bit more time, but the finished results and the cash in my pocket makes it worth while.

Enjoy!

Painted Faux Grain Sack Barrel

5-DSCF4024Painted Faux Grain Sack Barrel

1-DSCF4008I’ve had this barrel for several years, but since I no longer have a barn to keep it in, it has been in storage. I had used it to store craft supplies in, but moving it into the house in it’s original state was not happening. I like old and rustic, but the stains just didn’t appeal to me. The coffee cup puts the size into perspective.

The barrel is made of heavy cardboard, the bottom and the lid is wood and there is a metal ring around the bottom edge. I painted it all white, but it was boring. Since it was not only going to be used as storage again, but also as part of my home’s decor, it needed a little something-something.

2-DSCF4016I decided to give it a faux grain sack appearance. I masked off stripes on the top and bottom using painter’s tape.

3-DSCF4017The tape made painting nice crisp lines super easy.

4-DSCF4026But I still wasn’t done. The fleur-de-lis stencil I had used on the small end table a few weeks ago was sitting nearby.

Perfect!

5-DSCF4024It added just the right finish to the lid of the barrel.

I have a few more barrels of various sizes that could also be improved with this restyle. Yay!

Enjoy!

Shabby Chic Shelf

14-DSCF3994Shabby Chic Shelf

09-DSCF3950Another garage sale find. Oops, this picture was taken after I had fixed structural issues. It was in pieces because it was missing several screws.

10-DSCF3971I decided to make it a match to the shabby chic iron vanity chair from my previous post. With that in mind, the same painting technique was used.

11-DSCF3973Both baskets came with the shelf. The top basket was lined, but the green checked fabric didn’t fit in with my shabby chic vision. Using the old lining as a pattern, I made a new one using white eyelet fabric and eyelet ruffle trim.

13-DSCF3987Another singed flower that matched the chair was also added to the basket.

15-DSCF3980Here are the two pieces together.

Enjoy!

Shabby Chic Iron Vanity Chair

08-DSCF3988Shabby Chic Iron Vanity Chair

01-DSCF3937This was another find from my garage sale treasure hunt in Rose Hill, Kansas.

03-DSCF3945I got it for a steal, mostly because it would tip over backwards when someone sat in it. I knew immediately what the problem was. Unfortunately you can’t see what the problem was in these pics because I got excited and fixed it before grabbing the camera.

02-DSCF3941Basically, the problem was the braces between the legs. I took them off, turned them around and reattached them to the chair. This adjusted the legs to the way they were supposed to be. Score!

05-DSCF3962The chair had such cute lines, but I knew I would like it better with a shabby chic look. The technique I used wasn’t very technical.

04-DSCF3956I pounced white paint onto the iron and then painted a layer of pearl medium over the white.

06-DSCF3966I recovered the seat using white eyelet fabric. It was already quite a transformation, but it just didn’t seem done.

07-DSCF3984I decided to add a bit more girly-girl frill. I made a singed flower with some white lining fabric, lace and pearl beads.

08-DSCF3988It’s tied to the front of the chair with crinkled seam binding ribbon, but that’s just for the photo. It will be turned to the back of the chair so that it doesn’t get squished when the chair is being used.

Enjoy!