Metal Stamping Projects-Tutorials

metal stampingMetal Stamping Projects-Tutorials

Whew! It’s been a bit since I last posted. I’m still here, I’ve just been working on articles for Love To Know and projects I sell locally. Sometimes I get into the flow of things and forget to take pics…

…and sometimes I forget I have the pics after I have written tutorial for others sites…

…and then I wake up and share!

I had a lot of fun coming up with these projects for metal stamping. Years ago my dad had given me a basic metal stamping kit. Honestly, I wasn’t sure what I would ever do with it. Turns out it was a blast to play with. These projects would be great for craft shows.

DSCF6636Stamped Belt Cuff

These cuffs were made using old belts for the base.

DSCF6657Votive Candle Sleeve

Believe it or not, the metal I used for this candle sleeve was actually an aluminum oven liner.

DSCF6623Lucky Penny Key Ring

Stamping coins was “harder” than I thought it would be, but practicing only cost me pennies. 😉

Do you want to give it a try? You can find the free tutorials here.

Enjoy!

Irish Blessing Sign

DSCF7079Irish Blessing Sign

DSCF7058Yep, I’m at it again! Even though it takes a lot of time and is a bit fiddly, I love making stencils with my Cricut. While the sayings or quotes may not be original, my take on them is my own design. I hope you enjoy them.

We’ve had a lot of opportunities to get outside and cut wood this winter. Knock on wood (pun intended). Our winter has been pretty mild.

DSCF7062I put the signs together in much much the same way as I have previous ones. Pretty basic.

DSCF7066Because this was an Irish blessing, and with St. Patrick’s Day just around the corner, I debated on what colors to use.

DSCF7068I finally opted for neutral black and white so that the sign could be used for holiday decor, as well as everyday home decor.

DSCF7070The particular font I used on my Cricut did not have a comma, so I created my own and added the commas after the rest of the sign was stenciled.

DSCF7079I did add a touch of green raffia to the rusty wire hanger as a nod to St. Patrick’s Day. The raffia is just tied around the wire so it can easily be removed or replaced with a different color.

DSCF7073Enjoy!

Book Page Wreath

DSCF6798Book Page Wreath

I was going through some boxes that I had stored some craft supplies in when I came across some old books that were left over from a previous project. They became the inspiration for my next project.

I love the look of anything made with book pages, but I had never made a book page wreath. Preparing the books was the first thing on the agenda.

DSCF6790I used old paperbacks and removed the covers. Even the cover over the spine. I also tore them apart into small books about 1/4-inch thick. This makes it easier to accomplish the next step.

In a cake pan I placed eight single-serve tea bags and filled the pan with hot water. I let the bags steep for about 20 minutes and them removed the bags. Adding a few small books at a time, I submerged them in the tea and let them soak for a few minutes. I then let them drip off on a few layers of newspaper before I put them in a warm oven to dry. Drying does take a bit of time, but if you tea stain them one day, then the next you are ready to construct your wreath.

DSCF6791After the books were dry, I pulled each of the pages off the spine.

DSCF7042The wire for the wreath is a hanger. I cut the hook off and straightened it out, then I formed it into a circle. On one end I curled a closed loop that was folded vertically. On the other end I bent the end slightly in a horizontal direction. This was to visually remind me which way to bend the end when I finished the wreath. Making one vertical and one horizontal loop is important. If they were both one direction, then when they are attached the wreath will twist wonky.

DSCF6794The pages were simply folded in half. I placed two pages together, kinda crossing them so they didn’t line up perfectly.

DSCF7044The pair of pages were poked in the center with the end of the wire that was not looped, then slid around to the loop end. Because of the constant movement of the wreath while in progress, I applied a piece of masking tape over the loop and onto the first page. Yep, I know this is ugly, but it won’t be staying.

DSCF7054More folding, more poking, more folding, more poking…Yep, it is kinda boring, but if you put a movie on, you will be surprised how quickly it goes.

DSCF7072At some point you are probably wondering how many pages are needed. Well, that’s kind of hard to pinpoint. Depending on the size of your hanger, how thick your pages are and how firmly you push your folded pages together, it could be anywhere from 800-1200 pages. Most of my books were approximately 350 pages long and I used just shy of three books.

DSCF6780When the wreath is finally full, remove the tape from the loop and the first folded page. Bend the un-looped wire end at a right angle (in the same direction as your beginning slight bend). Insert the tip through the first loop, then curl the right angle into a closed loop.

DSCF6804A bit of lace for the hanger and the bow completed the wreath.

Enjoy!

Laminate Cupboards Restyled

DSCF6776Laminate Cupboards Restyled

DSCF6596I picked up these cupboards at a local auction a few weeks ago for a couple of bucks. By the looks of them you probably think I paid too much.

DSCF6576I mean, they are laminate! You can’t paint laminate! Wrong.

First of all I need to explain the difference between laminate and veneer. Many people use the terms interchangeably, but they are not the same thing. Veneer is a thin layer of wood covering a cheaper product. It can be sanded, painted and stained just like any other wood, but older pieces are often chipped or peeling. Those usually require a bit of gluing and wood putty. Laminate is like veneer in that it is a thin covering over a cheaper product, but it is not wood. It is man-made, often plastic. You CAN sand and paint it, but a primer is essential. It cannot be stained.

DSCF6588My cupboards were laminate. The insides were in great shape, but the outsides…not so much…well, at least the longer cupboard with the sliding front doors. I started by cleaning them up and giving them a light sanding, then they each got two good coats of primer. After these coats dried I gave the cupboards another thorough going over. Flaws that aren’t visible before often show more clearly after being primed. Glue and caulk are wonderful for correcting flaws on laminate furniture, but the base on the long cupboard was beyond fixable. Everything I did just seemed to make it crumble more. I finally gave up and removed it and built a new wood base.

DSCF6664They each got a couple coats of a pale butter color and were dry brushed with white.

DSCF6736Then I gave them about a week to cure before I stacked them. My new cupboard unit now looks like they were meant to go together.

DSCF6776I paint and sell a lot of furniture, but these are mine. Storage for pennies! Yay! You can’t beat that!

Enjoy!

Bushel and a Peck Signs

DSCF6563Bushel and a Peck Signs

The new sign I made for my Valentine’s Day front porch started it. I loved it so much that I couldn’t stop at just one. I made the one on my porch using a cupboard door, but I decided to use old wood from my wood pile to make more. I actually like the way they turned out even better. I didn’t have to stencil over any raised areas, making the printing look a lot neater.

The weather gave my husband a window of opportunity this last week so I gave him my measurements and he took care of cutting everything for me.

DSCF6511This is my pile of boards for the sign front…

DSCF6516…and these are for the back braces.

DSCF6527The signs took longer than normal to put together because I had to pull out a zillion staples… :(

DSCF6546After dry brushing the fronts…

DSCF6514…I used my stencil to create the magic.

DSCF6551I had quite the assembly line going on.

Enjoy!