Snowman Spoon Ornaments

6-DSCF2250Snowman Spoon Ornaments

My craft show this past weekend was a huge success. It was so good that I was really surprised I still had so much stuff to pack up. Since I only have one more show planned before Christmas you would think I don’t need to make anything new. Uh…you would be wrong. I can’t help it. Creating things makes me happy and content. :)

So, since my youngest comes home from school next week (and he’s bringing a friend), I need to get the house clean and organized. What to do?…What to do?…What to do? No problem. I’ll craft quick and simple projects in between the mundane chores of cleaning.

1-DSCF2226These spoons were my first inspiration. They said “snowmen” to me. And who’s to argue with the voices in my head?! I only had seven, but I reasoned clearing out even a small space in my stash was worth the effort.

2-DSCF2230I cleaned them up and based the bowl of the spoon using a beige paint.

3-DSCF2235After applying a little bit of blush (cheeks) with my finger…,

4-DSCF2242…the rest of the face was painted using a toothpick. Easy peasy!

5-DSCF2248A scrap of my T-shirt yarn was wrapped and glued around the base of the handle for the hat.

6-DSCF2250They still looked a bit plain, so wrapped a mini garland around the length of the handle.

It took a little bit of time, but I was able to drill a hole in the end of each handle for a wire hanger.

Enjoy!

Scrap Wood Christmas Trees-COMPLETE Tutorial

3-DSCN7278Scrap Wood Christmas Trees-COMPLETE Tutorial

I first made these trees and the tutorial last year, but just realized I had never posted the complete tutorial on my blog. Yes, there are snippets and pics here and there, but not the full tute. I’m fixing that oversight today.

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5-DSCN6755Do you have a scrap wood pile full of an assortment of boards left over from previous projects? Don’t let the difference in widths and lengths stop you from being creative. Use them together on one project to make a scrap wood Christmas tree to decorate your porch or yard.

Things You Will Need:

Scrap boards
Measuring tape
Chop saw
Hunter green acrylic paint
Paintbrush
Brown acrylic paint
Wood glue
12 wood screws
Drill, screwdriver bit and 3/32-inch bit
Star pattern
Pencil
Metal flashing scrap
Tin snips
Yellow-gold acrylic paint
Carpet tack
Rusty baling wire
Wire cutters
Needle nose pliers

1-DSCN7025Cut branches for the tree using scrap boards and a chop saw. You will need a 9-inch, a 14-inch, an 18-inch, a 24-inch, a 29-inch and a 32-inch-long board. Cut a 45-inch-long board for the tree trunk. The width of each board can be any size from 2 to 4 1/2 inches.

2-DSCN7028Dry brush one side of each branch using hunter green acrylic paint. Dry brush one side of the trunk using brown acrylic paint. Allow the paint to dry.

Lay the trunk on your work surface with the painted side facing up. Turn the trunk so that it is pointing away from you vertically. With the painted side of the branches facing up, horizontally place each one across the trunk starting with the shortest branch at the top and ending with the longest at the bottom.

Shift the top branch 5 inches down from the top and the bottom branch 9 inches up from the bottom of the trunk. Adjust and equally space the remaining branches between the top and bottom branches. Center each branch on the trunk.

Apply wood glue between each branch and the trunk. Allow the glue to dry.

Turn the tree over with the back side facing up. Run two wood screws per branch through the trunk and into the branches. Note: Make sure your screws are long enough to go through the trunk and into the branches, but not too long where they will poke through the front of the branches. If cracking wood is a concern, drill pilot holes for the screws before attaching.

3-DSCN7033Trace a star approximately 6 inches in diameter onto a scrap of metal flashing. Use tin snips to cut out the star. Paint one side of the star using yellow-gold acrylic paint.

Lay the tree with the front side facing up. Place the star on the trunk at the top of the tree. Attach the star to the trunk using a carpet tack through the center of the star.

4-DSCN7035Attach a wire hanger. Using a 3/32-inch drill bit, drill a hole on each end of the top branch 1 inch down from the top of the branch and 1 inch in from the ends. Cut a 24-inch length of rusty baling wire using wire cutters. Insert one end through each hole from the front of the branch to the back. Pull the wire ends through approximately 2 inches. Bend the loop of the hanger up. Twist the wire ends around the wire on the front of the branch using needle nose pliers.

5-DSCN7037Enjoy!

Pumpkin Candle Holder

1-100_1705Pumpkin Candle Holder

Since my kids are older, I find that my holiday decorating has evolved from the plastic manufactured holiday decorations, to decorations that are mainly handmade and carry a theme with their color and presentation. There are no more plastic clings in the windows that have been stuck on with spit. I still like whimsical decorations, but they are sprinkled among more sophisticated items that say “adults live here and they still like to have fun.”

Fall is my favorite time of year. I love the crispness to the air, the leaves crunching under my feet and the warm glow of a fireplace or candles. The house I live in does not have a fireplace, so candles it is. I made a fall candle holder using a pumpkin as the base. It looks great as a table centerpiece, but would also be pretty on a fireplace mantle or side table.

The instructions for this candle holder can be altered to fit any size pumpkin by adjusting the size of the candle used.

Materials Needed:

Pumpkin-mine was about the size of a basketball
Serrated knife or pumpkin carving tools
Pillar candle-Mine was 2 1/2 inches in diameter and 4 inches tall
Marking pen
Spoon or scoop of some sort
Object to use as a pedestal
Fall floral decorations
Hot glue gun-optional

Carefully cut around the stem of your pumpkin and remove it. This cut does not need to be a perfect circle, but it does need to be smaller than the diameter of your candle.

Stand the pillar candle over the hole and trace around it with a marking pen. If the top of the pumpkin is not level, tip the candle to a level position before tracing around it. Cut around the traced line, keeping the cuts straight up and down. You do want to be fairly precise with this cut. The candle will fit inside this hole snuggly to prevent a lot of air flow. The less air in the pumpkin, the longer it will last.

Dilemma: To clean out the guts or not to clean out the guts. I decided to clean and cut away the guts directly below the hole I had carved, but I left the rest inside. The guts inside are not going to show anyway. The spot below the hole needed the space for a pedestal to place the candle on. I figured the candle would begin to sink after a few days if it didn’t have a stable surface to rest on.

Scavenge for a plastic or glass object that will fit inside the hole of the pumpkin to create a pedestal for your candle. It needs to sit flat on the bottom of the pumpkin and the top of it needs to sit below the cutout opening. I used a glass bud vase. Place your pillar candle inside the hole and resting securely on the pedestal.

2-100_1705-001Decorate around the base of the candle. Place a fall floral candle ring around the candle, wind a short section of a fall garland around the candle, or hot glue a variety of silk fall leaves, flowers and berries around the candle. The first two ideas are much more frugal. The pumpkin will eventually decay and you can recycle decorations for a new candle holder.

There are a couple of safety tips I feel I should mention. One, do not leave your candle burning in an unoccupied room and two, place your pumpkin on a plate or flower pot saucer to prevent any seepage from destroying your table’s surface.

1-100_1705Enjoy!

Primitive Pumpkin Shutter

5-DSCN2316-001Primitive Pumpkin Shutter

I love turning things that end up on the curb into fun and whimsical seasonal decorations. Paint an old window shutter into a primitive pumpkin shutter for fall and Halloween decor. Not a painter? No problem. This is a primitive project, and crisp straight lines are not required. Except for the drying time of the paint, this shutter can be completed very quickly.

Things You Will Need:

Old window shutter
Tools for removing hardware
Orange acrylic paint
Paper plate
Sea sponge
Black acrylic paint
Stencil brush
Kitchen sponges
Permanent marker
Ruler
Scissors
Yellow-gold acrylic paint
Artist’s paintbrush
Green acrylic paint

1-DSCN2274-001Remove any hinges, knobs and hooks from your shutter and clean well.

Pour orange acrylic paint onto a paper plate. Wet a sea sponge and wring it out well. Dip the sponge in the paint and sponge it over the front, back and side surfaces of the shutter. Do not worry about complete coverage. This project allows for the original surface to peek through. Allow the paint to dry.

2-DSCN2286-001Many window shutters have a spine on the front that opens and closes the slats. For this project, this side will be the back. You want the flattest side to paint your pumpkin on. Lay the shutter with the flat side facing up. This is now the front. Pour black paint onto a paper plate. Dip the sea sponge in the paint and dab it on the front and sides of the shutter. The back will remain orange. Allow the paint to dry.

4-DSCN2301-001Using a large stencil brush, pounce orange paint in a long oval that covers most of the front surface on the shutter. This is your pumpkin shape. Allow the paint to dry.

3-DSCN2294-001Trace a 3-inch-tall triangle with a 2-inch base on a kitchen sponge using a permanent marking pen. Cut out the shape using scissors. Raggedy edges are fine. Draw a 1 1/2-inch-wide by 4 1/4-inch long rectangle on another kitchen sponge. Round the corners of the rectangle. Cut out the rectangle.

Dip the triangle into black acrylic paint. Stamp the triangle in the center of the pumpkin shape. This is the nose. Using the triangle and black paint, apply the eyes above the nose as desired. Dip the rectangle sponge into yellow-gold acrylic paint and stamp a mouth below the nose. Allow the paint to dry.

Dip an artist’s paintbrush into black acrylic paint. Paint a thin line around the mouth. This is supposed to look primitive, so perfect lines are not necessary. Paint a thin line across the center of the mouth. Paint vertical lines across the center line to create the teeth. Allow the paint to dry.

Using green acrylic paint, paint a stem at the top of the pumpkin.

5-DSCN2316-001My shutter was 6 1/2 inches wide by 20 inches long. This primitive project allows for altering and adjusting the steps to fit on any size shutter.

The finished shutter will lean against a wall or furniture, as it will not lay flat because of the spine on the back.

Enjoy!

Foam Cone Candy Corn-Tutorial

7-DSCN2206-001Foam Cone Candy Corn

When the kids go back to school, I start getting serious about crafting for fall and winter holidays. More specifically, I begin stocking up on quick projects to sell at local craft sales. This whimsical candy corn couldn’t be more simple. Made with a foam cone as the base, it is quickly wrapped with ripped strips of fabric. Make several candy corns in a variety of sizes and display them in a basket, or as a centerpiece on a dining table.

Things You Will Need:

White cotton fabric
Ruler
Scissors
Foam cone
Craft glue
Yellow cotton fabric
Marking pen
Orange cotton fabric

1-DSCN2196-001Rip 1-inch-wide strips of white cotton fabric. The strips can be any length, making this a great project for using up scraps. The amount of strips needed will depend on the size of the cone you are using. If you are being frugal, start with a few and rip more as needed.

2-DSCN2197-001Apply craft glue to the top point of your cone and around the first inch below the top. Fold one end of a strip over the top, completely covering the tip. Turn the strip and wrap around the cone just below the top. This start will hide the tip and secure the end of the strip.

3-DSCN2198-001Add more glue to the sides of the cone. Continue to wrap strips, overlapping the side edges of the strips after each wrap around the cone. You can completely cover the sides of the cone with glue at this time, but to avoid a mess, I apply glue to the next couple of inches below the top, continue to wrap the strips and add more glue as needed. As you finish off one strip, continue to add more until the whole cone has been wrapped with white fabric. Do not cover the bottom of the cone.

Lay yellow cotton fabric with the wrong side facing up on your work surface. Stand the cone on the fabric. Using a marking pen, trace around the bottom of the cone, 1 inch from the cone’s edge. Cut out the circle of yellow fabric.

4-DSCN2200-001Apply craft glue to the flat bottom of the cone. Place the fabric circle on the bottom with the right side of the fabric facing out. Center the circle with an even amount extending past the edges of the cone’s bottom. Cut the extended fabric in slits spaced 1/4 inch apart. Apply glue to the back of each slit and fold them over the edge of the cone.

5-DSCN2203-001Rip 1-inch-wide strips of the yellow cotton fabric. Starting on the sides of the bottom edge, apply glue and wrap the strip around the cone. Continue wrapping up the cone in the same way as the white strips were attached. Stop when the bottom third of the cone has been wrapped in yellow.

6-DSCN2205-001Rip 1-inch-wide strips of orange fabric. Wrap and glue them over the middle third of the cone. Note: The top white third does not need to be wrapped again.

7-DSCN2206-001To embellish, wrap raffia, jute or a fabric strip around the center of the candy corn and tie into a bow. Glue two or three buttons to the cone as desired.

Enjoy!