Summer Wine Glass Coasters

1-DSCF4092Summer Wine Glass Coasters

Okay, these can actually be used any time of the year, but when the weather heats up the glasses sweat badly. Insert the foot of your wine glass inside these “cozy” little coasters and your furniture will be protected. You also don’t have to worry about tips or losing the coaster when you move it because the coaster is actually attached to the wine glass. Some of us may need that help after a glass or too. 😉

8-DSCF4116For the this project session I chose patriotic fabric for one type and Wizard of Oz fabric for two other types. My dear friend, Mary W. picked up the Wizard of Oz fabric for me several years ago when she went to a quilt show. See, Mary, I knew I would find just the right project for this yummy fabric.

These coasters will be heading to my Etsy shop in the next day or so, but if you would like to make your own, I’m a giver. Here is my wine glass coaster tutorial.

7-wine glass cozy coasterI wrote this tutorial last year so the photos for the steps were done with different fabric than the ones I made this week.

Things You Will Need:

Light to medium weight scrap fabric-two different colors or designs
Ruler
Scissors
Iron
Straight pins
Wine glass

1-wine glass cozy coasterCut five 4-inch squares from light to medium weight fabric. Leftover squares from quilt projects is ideal. You will need three of one fabric and two of another.

5-DSCF4108Fold one square in half with the right sides facing out. Iron the fold. Repeat on a matching square and two of the other fabric squares for a total of four pressed squares that are now shaped like rectangles.

2-wine glass cozy coasterPlace the remaining unfolded square on your work surface with the right side facing up.

3-wine glass cozy coasterWith the raw edges of the rectangles aligned with the raw edges of the square, work around the square.

5-wine glass cozy coasterPlace one rectangle on each edge, turning the square one-quarter turn after the placement of each rectangle. Insert the end of the last rectangle under the end of the first.

6-wine glass cozy coasterPin the raw edges of the rectangles to the outer edges of the square. Sew around the pinned edges using a 1/4-inch seam allowance.

Clip each of the corners to reduce bulk.

3-DSCF4098Turn the cozy coaster right side out through the opening in the center of the rectangles. Use the point of your scissors to poke out the corners. Iron the cozy flat.

Slip the foot of your wine glass into the center of the cozy.

4-DSCF4104Note: All of the wine glasses I have used had feet with a diameter of 2 1/2 inches. This may be standard, but they may also be available in other sizes. If the feet of your glasses are bigger (I can’t imagine them smaller), simply cut your squares 1 1/2 inches larger than the diameter measurement. Example: Cut 4 1/2-inch squares for a 3-inch diameter foot.

This is an inexpensive hostess gift, whether you sew your own or purchase. Check out my Etsy shop in a few days if you would rather purchase than make your own.

Enjoy!

Mini Crocheted Teddy Bear-The Tutorial

1-DSCF2929

Mini Crochet Teddy Bear-Tutorial

A lot of you have messaged, commented and emailed me asking for the mini crocheted teddy bear tutorial.

Woo Hoo! It has been published. You can find it here.

If you do not want to make your own, I do have them for sale in my Etsy shop.

Enjoy!

Cutter Quilt Knapsack

knapsack 7Cutter Quilt Knapsack

I made this project last year, but I never posted it on my blog. I had cut pieces to make a few more, but didn’t get around to finishing them. Since the weather has turned frigid again, it’s the perfect time to pull them out and complete them. That’s what I’m working on today.

Stitch up a shabby chic knapsack using an old worn quilt that is no longer useable as it was originally intended. This quick-to-sew project is designed with exposed seams, giving it a charming scrappy appearance. If you would like to give this project a shot, here is my tutorial.

Things You Will Need:

Old worn quilt
1/8 yard muslin
Measuring tape
Scissors
Sewing machine
Straight pins
40-inch cord of your choice
Bodkin or large safety pin
Button, velcro or snap

2-DSCF1107Cut knapsack pieces from an old cutter quilt:

Body-(2) 15-inch-tall by 17-inch-wide
Pocket and Flap-(1 each) 7-inch-square
Handle Loop-(1) 2-inch-wide by 8-inch-long
Straps-(2) 2-inch-wide by 36-inch-long

From muslin, cut one 4-inch-wide by 32-inch long strip for the drawstring casing.

Top stitch around all the cutter quilt pieces 1/4 inch from the edges. This will secure the layers of the quilt together.

knapsack 1Lay one body rectangle on your work surface with the right side facing up and the long edges running horizontal. This rectangle will be the front of the knapsack. The long edges are the top and bottom edges of your knapsack. Place the pocket square on the rectangle with the right side facing up. Position the bottom edge of the pocket 2 1/2 inches above the bottom edge of the rectangle. Center the sides of the pocket between the sides of the rectangle. Top stitch the sides and bottom of the pocket, 1/4 inch from the edge, connecting it to the rectangle. Note: The edges will be exposed throughout the project unless otherwise instructed.

Place the two body rectangles together with the right sides facing out. Align the edges. Cut a 3-inch square from both bottom corners, through all thicknesses. Pin the side and bottom edges. Do not pin the cut out square corners. Sew the pinned edges using a 1/4-inch seam allowance.

knapsack 2Open a corner and diagonally squeeze the opening. Match the side seam with the bottom seam, with the right sides facing out. Pin the edges together. Sew the pinned edge using a 1/4-inch seam allowance. This creates a boxed corner. Repeat on the remaining bottom corner of the knapsack.

knapsack 3Lay the knapsack body on your work surface with the back facing up. Measure in 3/4 inch from one bottom corner. Place one end of a strap on the bottom seam at this measurement. Pin to hold. Pin an end of the remaining strap 3/4 inch in from the other bottom corner. Sew over the pinned ends using a 1/4-inch seam allowance.

knapsack 4Lay the knapsack body on your work surface with the back facing up once again. Find the center of the top edge. Stack the unsecured ends of the straps together and pin to the top edge of the body back. Pin an end of the handle loop on each side of the stacked straps. Center one edge of the flap square over the pinned loop and straps with the flap facing wrong side up. Fold the muslin casing strip in half with the long edges matching. Find the center of the casing length and pin the raw edges to the top edge of the knapsack’s back through all thicknesses. Continue to pin the raw edges of the casing around the top edge of the knapsack. You will have a gap between the ends of the casing on the front of the knapsack. Sew the pinned edge using a 1/4-inch seam allowance. Yes, all the layers make the back section quite thick, but it can be sewn through. A heavyduty (jean) needle is recommended.

knapsack 5Attach a bodkin or large safety pin to one end of a 40-inch length of cording. Thread the cording through the casing. Adjust the cording with an equal amount exposed from each opening of the casing. This is the drawstring closure for the knapsack.

knapsack 6Flip the flap over the top and to the front of the knapsack. Attach a button, velcro or snap to the front and flap of the knapsack to close.

knapsack 7(sigh) I love my machine and I used to love the buttonhole foot, but the finished one in the photo has a button/buttonhole closure. My sewing machine seems to have issues lately with making buttonholes, so the ones I am finishing today will have velcro closures with buttons for decoration. Since I’m sure Brother reads each and every one of my blogs with immense interest, Brother Sewing Machine company, I would be happy to test out new models. 😉 LOL! Just saying…

Enjoy!

Snowman Hurricane Shade

3-DSCN3068-001A last-minute quickie for the holidays.

Add a warm, whimsical glow to your dining table with a snowman hurricane shade.

1-DSCN3058-001This snowman started out as a clear glass hurricane shade I picked up at a yard sale. The shade was classic for everyday use, but I wanted something a little more festive for the holidays. I chose to use acrylic enamel as the base for the snowman to ensure the paint would be durable and less likely to scratch or flake from handling. This is a quick project that can be completed in about an hour, including drying time.

Things You Will Need:

Clear glass hurricane shade
Window cleaner
Paper towel
Sea sponge
White acrylic enamel paint
Paper plate
Paintbrush
Powder blush
Bath towel
Orange acrylic paint
New pencil
Black acrylic paint
Black paint pen
Christmas fabric
Scissors
Measuring tape

Thoroughly clean the outside of the shade using window cleaner and a paper towel.

2-DSCN3063-001Wet a sea sponge and wring it out so that it’s damp, but not dripping. Pour white acrylic enamel paint onto a paper plate. Place the hurricane shade over your arm. With the other hand, dip the sponge into the paint and dab it on the glass. Repeat until the entire outer surface of the shade has been painted. Carefully stand the shade on your work surface to dry.

Using a paintbrush and powder blush, paint two large cheeks on the center-front of the shade.

Lay the shade on a bath towel to prevent the shade from rolling. Dip a paintbrush in orange acrylic paint. Pointing it to one side, paint a 2-inch triangle with a 3/4-inch base between the cheeks for the carrot nose.

Dip the eraser end of a new pencil in black acrylic paint. Dot two eyes spaced 1/4 inch apart and 1/2 inch above the nose.

Draw a smile using a black paint pen. Allow the face paint to dry.

Rip a 2-inch wide by 36-inch long strip from Christmas fabric. Stand the shade right side up on your work surface. Wrap the fabric strip around the bottom of the shade. Bring the ends together and tie into a bow on the front of the snowman. Trim the ends of the strip as desired.

3-DSCN3068-001Light a tea candle in a glass votive holder. Place the snowman hurricane shade over the candle. The candlelight will shine through the snowman head.

For a snowman hurricane shade that can be displayed throughout the winter months, substitute a winter novelty fabric for the Christmas fabric.

Enjoy!

Recycled Sweater Christmas Stocking

DSCN3830Recycled Sweater Christmas Stocking

When I see old sweaters at yard sales I have to buy them. The fact that yard sales in my area are often held when the temperature is over 100 means sweaters are practically given away. These sweaters are a cheap craft resource for holiday crafts. In my opinion, this Christmas stocking design looks much more upscale than the original sweater it came from. Can’t you just see a bunch of these hanging over a cabin fireplace, or down the rail of a pine garland clad staircase? Depending on the size of the sweater and the size of your stocking pattern, you should be able to get at least two stockings from each sweater. Three, if you open the sleeves and use the cuffs as the top edge.

Things You Will Need:

Adult-size sweater
Stocking pattern
Straight pins
Scissors
Sewing machine
Iron
Measuring tape
Rickrack
2-inch pompoms (two)
Hot glue gun

DSCN3812Turn an adult-size sweater wrong side out and lay it on your work surface. Align the bottom edges of the sweater. Place an existing Christmas stocking, or a paper stocking pattern on the sweater. Align the top edge of the stocking shape (pattern) with the bottom edges of the stocking. Pin the pattern through both layers of the sweater. Cut around the pattern. Note: The top of the stocking (bottom edge of the sweater) is not to be cut. It will be the finished edge for the the top opening of the stocking.

DSCN3820Remove the pattern. Pin the side and bottom edges of the sweater stocking shape together. Sew the pinned edges using a straight stitch and a 1/4-inch seam allowance. Sew around the edges once again using a zigzag stitch on the seam allowance. This will finish the raw edges and prevent the knitted stitches from unraveling. Turn the stocking right side out. Press the seams with a warm iron.

DSCN3828Lay the stocking flat on your work surface. Measure across the width of the stocking at its widest point. Double that and add 24 inches. Using your new measurement, cut a length of rickrack in a color that coordinates with your sweater.

Measure 1 inch down from the top edge of your stocking. Starting on the front seam of the stocking and 12 inches from one end of the rickrack, pin the rickrack around the stocking. The rickrack will meet again on the front seam of the stocking. Both ends of the rickrack will have approximately 12 inches extending. These tails will be ties. Top stitch the pinned rickrack around the stocking.

Tie the rickrack tails in a knot against the seam, then tie into a bow. Trim the tails to the desired length.

Burrow a hole on one side of a 2-inch diameter pompom. Apply hot glue in the hole. Place one end of the rickrack in the glue. Squeeze the edges of the pompom hole around the rickrack end. Repeat with the remaining pompom and and rickrack end.

Cut a 5-inch length of rickrack. Fold the rickrack in half, matching the two cut ends. Place the ends inside the stocking, against the back seam. Sew across the cut ends of the rickrack. This is your stocking’s hanger.

Other trims and tassels handmade with yarn can be substituted.

DSCN3830Enjoy!